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Follow-up on commitments at the Third Global Forum on Human Resources for Health: Indonesia, Sudan, Tanzania

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
41 Mendeley
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Title
Follow-up on commitments at the Third Global Forum on Human Resources for Health: Indonesia, Sudan, Tanzania
Published in
Human Resources for Health, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12960-016-0112-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gilles Dussault, Elsheikh Badr, Hartiah Haroen, Martin Mapunda, Achmad Soebagja Tancarino Mars, Kirana Pritasari, Giorgio Cometto

Abstract

This study sought to assess actions which Indonesia, Sudan, and Tanzania took to implement the health workforce commitments they made at the Third Global Forum on Human Resources for Health (HRH) in November 2013. The study was conducted through a survey of published and gray literature in English and field research consisting of direct contacts with relevant ministries and agencies. Results show that the three countries implemented interventions to translate their commitments into actions. The three countries focused their commitments on improving the availability, geographical accessibility, quality of education, and performance of health workers. The implementation of the Recife commitments primarily entailed initiatives at the central level, such as the adoption of new legislation or the development of accreditation mechanisms. This study shows that action is more likely to take place when policy documents explicitly recognize and document HRH problems, when stakeholders are involved in the formulation and the implementation of policy changes, and when external support is available. The Recife Forum appears to have created an opportunity to advance the HRH policy agenda, and advocates of health workforce development in these three countries took advantage of it.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 22%
Researcher 8 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 7%
Librarian 2 5%
Other 11 27%
Unknown 5 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 22%
Social Sciences 8 20%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 6 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2018.
All research outputs
#1,888,385
of 14,557,384 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#259
of 798 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#46,107
of 261,377 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#5
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,557,384 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 798 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,377 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.