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Defining rules of CD8+ T cell expansion against pre-erythrocytic Plasmodium antigens in sporozoite-immunized mice

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, April 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

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5 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

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14 Mendeley
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Title
Defining rules of CD8+ T cell expansion against pre-erythrocytic Plasmodium antigens in sporozoite-immunized mice
Published in
Malaria Journal, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1295-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zachary P. Billman, Arnold Kas, Brad C. Stone, Sean C. Murphy

Abstract

Whole Plasmodium sporozoites serve as both experimental tools and potentially as deployable vaccines in the fight against malaria infection. Live sporozoites infect hepatocytes and induce a diverse repertoire of CD8(+) T cell responses, some of which are capable of killing Plasmodium-infected hepatocytes. Previous studies in Plasmodium yoelii-immunized BALB/c mice showed that some CD8(+) T cell responses expanded with repeated parasite exposure, whereas other responses did not. Here, similar outcomes were observed using known Plasmodium berghei epitopes in C57BL/6 mice. With the exception of the response to PbTRAP, IFNγ-producing T cell responses to most studied antigens, such as PbGAP50, failed to re-expand in mice immunized with two doses of irradiated P. berghei sporozoites. In an effort to boost secondary CD8(+) T cell responses, heterologous cross-species immunizations were performed. Alignment of P. yoelii 17XNL and P. berghei ANKA proteins revealed that >60 % of the amino acids in syntenic orthologous proteins are continuously homologous in fragments ≥8-amino acids long, suggesting that cross-species immunization could potentially trigger responses to a large number of common Class I epitopes. Heterologous immunization resulted in a larger liver burden than homologous immunization. Amongst seven tested antigen-specific responses, only CSP- and TRAP-specific CD8(+) T cell responses were expanded by secondary homologous sporozoite immunization and only those to the L3 ribosomal protein and S20 could be re-expanded by heterologous immunization. In general, heterologous late-arresting, genetically attenuated sporozoites were better at secondarily expanding L3-specific responses than were irradiated sporozoites. GAP50 and several other antigens shared between P. berghei and P. yoelii induced a large number of IFNγ-positive T cells during primary immunization, yet these responses could not be re-expanded by either homologous or heterologous secondary immunization. These studies highlight how responses to different sporozoite antigens can markedly differ in recall following repeated sporozoite vaccinations. Cross-species immunization broadens the secondary response to sporozoites and may represent a novel strategy for candidate antigen discovery.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 7%
Unknown 13 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 43%
Researcher 2 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 14%
Student > Bachelor 1 7%
Lecturer 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 7%
Other 2 14%
Unknown 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 May 2016.
All research outputs
#5,051,191
of 10,446,734 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,735
of 3,313 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,443
of 275,818 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#76
of 162 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,446,734 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 51st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,313 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,818 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 162 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.