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Early-Life Intranasal Colonization with Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Exacerbates Juvenile Airway Disease in Mice

Overview of attention for article published in Infection and Immunity, April 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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13 Mendeley
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Title
Early-Life Intranasal Colonization with Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Exacerbates Juvenile Airway Disease in Mice
Published in
Infection and Immunity, April 2016
DOI 10.1128/iai.01539-15
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jessica R. McCann, Stanley N. Mason, Richard L. Auten, Joseph W. St. Geme, Patrick C. Seed

Abstract

Accumulating evidence suggests a connection between asthma development and colonization with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Specifically, nasopharyngeal colonization of human infants with NTHi within 4 weeks of birth is associated with an increased risk of asthma development later in childhood. Monocytes derived from these infants have aberrant inflammatory responses to common upper respiratory bacterial antigens when compared to cells derived from infants who were not colonized and do not go on to develop asthma symptoms in childhood. In this study, we hypothesized that early life colonization with NTHi promotes immune system reprogramming and the development of atypical inflammatory responses. To address this hypothesis in a highly controlled model, we tested whether colonization of mice with NTHi on day of life 3 induced or exacerbated juvenile airways disease using an ovalbumin (OVA) allergic model of asthma. We found that animals that were colonized on day of life 3 and subjected to induction of allergy had exacerbated airways disease as juveniles, defined as increased cellular infiltration into the lung, increased inflammatory cytokines IL5 and IL13 in the lung lavage fluid, decreased regulatory T cell-associated FOXP3 gene expression, and increased mucus production. We also found that colonization with NTHi amplified airway resistance in response to increasing doses of a bronchoconstrictor following OVA immunization and challenge. Together, the murine model provides evidence for early life immune programming that precedes the development of juvenile airways disease and corroborates observations in human children.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 3 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 23%
Student > Bachelor 2 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 15%
Researcher 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 5 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 8%
Unknown 2 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 May 2017.
All research outputs
#1,412,401
of 12,359,213 outputs
Outputs from Infection and Immunity
#286
of 5,688 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,766
of 269,865 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infection and Immunity
#8
of 101 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,359,213 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,688 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,865 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 101 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.