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Highly Efficient Amplification of Chronic Wasting Disease Agent by Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification with Beads (PMCAb)

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, April 2012
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Title
Highly Efficient Amplification of Chronic Wasting Disease Agent by Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification with Beads (PMCAb)
Published in
PLoS ONE, April 2012
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0035383
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chad J. Johnson, Judd M. Aiken, Debbie McKenzie, Michael D. Samuel, Joel A. Pedersen

Abstract

Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) has emerged as an important technique for detecting low levels of pathogenic prion protein in biological samples. The method exploits the ability of the pathogenic prion protein to convert the normal prion protein to a proteinase K-resistant conformation. Inclusion of Teflon® beads in the PMCA reaction (PMCAb) has been previously shown to increase the sensitivity and robustness of detection for the 263 K and SSLOW strains of hamster-adapted prions. Here, we demonstrate that PMCAb with saponin dramatically increases the sensitivity of detection for chronic wasting disease (CWD) agent without compromising the specificity of the assay (i.e., no false positive results). Addition of Teflon® beads increased the robustness of the PMCA reaction, resulting in a decrease in the variability of PMCA results. Three rounds of serial PMCAb allowed detection of CWD agent from a 6.7 × 10(-13) dilution of 10% brain homogenate (1.3 fg of source brain). Titration of the same brain homogenate in transgenic mice expressing cervid prion protein (Tg(CerPrP)1536(+/-) mice) allowed detection of CWD agent from the 10(-6) dilution of 10% brain homogenate. PMCAb is, thus, more sensitive than bioassay in transgenic mice by a factor exceeding 10(5). Additionally, we are able to amplify CWD agent from brain tissue and lymph nodes of CWD-positive white-tailed deer having Prnp alleles associated with reduced disease susceptibility.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 1 4%
Unknown 27 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 18%
Professor 3 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 11%
Other 5 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 21%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 14%
Unspecified 3 11%
Environmental Science 2 7%
Other 5 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 April 2012.
All research outputs
#9,669,365
of 12,091,105 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#98,868
of 133,011 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,328
of 95,805 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#2,387
of 3,068 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,091,105 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 133,011 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 3,068 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.