↓ Skip to main content

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing for addiction susceptibility: a premature commercialisation of doubtful validity and value

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Addiction (to Alcohol & Other Drugs), April 2012
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
61 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Direct-to-consumer genetic testing for addiction susceptibility: a premature commercialisation of doubtful validity and value
Published in
British Journal of Addiction (to Alcohol & Other Drugs), April 2012
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2012.03836.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rebecca Mathews, Wayne Hall, Adrian Carter

Abstract

Genetic research on addiction liability and pharmacogenetic research on treatments for addiction have identified some genetic variants associated with disease risk and treatment. Genetic testing for addiction liability and treatment response has not been used widely in clinical practice because most of the genes identified only modestly predict addiction risk or treatment response. However, many of these genetic tests have been commercialized prematurely and are available direct to the consumer (DTC). The easy availability of DTC tests for addiction liability and lack of regulation over their use raises a number of ethical concerns. Of paramount concern is the limited predictive power and clinical utility of these tests. Many DTC testing companies do not provide the consumer with the necessary genetic counselling to assist them in interpreting and acting on their test results. They may also engage in misleading marketing to entice consumers to purchase their products. Consumers' genetic information may be vulnerable to misuse by third parties, as there are limited standards to protect the privacy of the genetic information. Non-consensual testing and inappropriate testing of minors may also occur. The United States Food and Drug Administration plans to regulate DTC genetic tests. Based on the ethical concerns we discuss below, we believe there is a strong case for regulation of DTC genetic tests for addiction liability and treatment response. We argue that until this occurs, these tests have more potential to cause harm than to contribute to improved prevention and treatment of addiction.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 60 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 16%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Researcher 6 10%
Unspecified 4 7%
Other 15 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 15%
Social Sciences 7 11%
Psychology 6 10%
Unspecified 6 10%
Other 24 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 November 2012.
All research outputs
#6,484,228
of 12,354,754 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Addiction (to Alcohol & Other Drugs)
#3,392
of 4,190 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50,878
of 116,403 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Addiction (to Alcohol & Other Drugs)
#34
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,354,754 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,190 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.0. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 116,403 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.