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Natural speech reveals the semantic maps that tile human cerebral cortex

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
89 news outlets
blogs
25 blogs
twitter
1061 tweeters
facebook
115 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
33 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor
video
2 video uploaders

Readers on

mendeley
1264 Mendeley
citeulike
4 CiteULike
Title
Natural speech reveals the semantic maps that tile human cerebral cortex
Published in
Nature, April 2016
DOI 10.1038/nature17637
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexander G. Huth, Wendy A. de Heer, Thomas L. Griffiths, Frédéric E. Theunissen, Jack L. Gallant, Huth, Alexander G, de Heer, Wendy A, Griffiths, Thomas L, Theunissen, Frédéric E, Gallant, Jack L

Abstract

The meaning of language is represented in regions of the cerebral cortex collectively known as the 'semantic system'. However, little of the semantic system has been mapped comprehensively, and the semantic selectivity of most regions is unknown. Here we systematically map semantic selectivity across the cortex using voxel-wise modelling of functional MRI (fMRI) data collected while subjects listened to hours of narrative stories. We show that the semantic system is organized into intricate patterns that seem to be consistent across individuals. We then use a novel generative model to create a detailed semantic atlas. Our results suggest that most areas within the semantic system represent information about specific semantic domains, or groups of related concepts, and our atlas shows which domains are represented in each area. This study demonstrates that data-driven methods--commonplace in studies of human neuroanatomy and functional connectivity--provide a powerful and efficient means for mapping functional representations in the brain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 1,061 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,264 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 42 3%
United Kingdom 14 1%
Germany 10 <1%
Japan 6 <1%
Brazil 6 <1%
Israel 4 <1%
Italy 4 <1%
Canada 4 <1%
Spain 4 <1%
Other 36 3%
Unknown 1134 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 379 30%
Researcher 252 20%
Student > Master 166 13%
Student > Bachelor 105 8%
Professor 74 6%
Other 288 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 326 26%
Neuroscience 226 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 182 14%
Computer Science 113 9%
Unspecified 110 9%
Other 307 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1670. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 June 2018.
All research outputs
#749
of 11,379,683 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#146
of 59,073 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45
of 276,807 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#9
of 985 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,379,683 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 59,073 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 70.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,807 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 985 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.