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The genomic and transcriptomic architecture of 2,000 breast tumours reveals novel subgroups

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, April 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
11 news outlets
blogs
16 blogs
twitter
173 tweeters
patent
33 patents
facebook
5 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
7 Google+ users
reddit
3 Redditors
q&a
1 Q&A thread

Citations

dimensions_citation
3771 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
3207 Mendeley
citeulike
32 CiteULike
Title
The genomic and transcriptomic architecture of 2,000 breast tumours reveals novel subgroups
Published in
Nature, April 2012
DOI 10.1038/nature10983
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christina Curtis, Sohrab P. Shah, Suet-Feung Chin, Gulisa Turashvili, Oscar M. Rueda, Mark J. Dunning, Doug Speed, Andy G. Lynch, Shamith Samarajiwa, Yinyin Yuan, Stefan Gräf, Gavin Ha, Gholamreza Haffari, Ali Bashashati, Roslin Russell, Steven McKinney, Anita Langerød, Andrew Green, Elena Provenzano, Gordon Wishart, Sarah Pinder, Peter Watson, Florian Markowetz, Leigh Murphy, Ian Ellis, Arnie Purushotham, Anne-Lise Børresen-Dale, James D. Brenton, Simon Tavaré, Carlos Caldas, Samuel Aparicio

Abstract

The elucidation of breast cancer subgroups and their molecular drivers requires integrated views of the genome and transcriptome from representative numbers of patients. We present an integrated analysis of copy number and gene expression in a discovery and validation set of 997 and 995 primary breast tumours, respectively, with long-term clinical follow-up. Inherited variants (copy number variants and single nucleotide polymorphisms) and acquired somatic copy number aberrations (CNAs) were associated with expression in ~40% of genes, with the landscape dominated by cis- and trans-acting CNAs. By delineating expression outlier genes driven in cis by CNAs, we identified putative cancer genes, including deletions in PPP2R2A, MTAP and MAP2K4. Unsupervised analysis of paired DNA–RNA profiles revealed novel subgroups with distinct clinical outcomes, which reproduced in the validation cohort. These include a high-risk, oestrogen-receptor-positive 11q13/14 cis-acting subgroup and a favourable prognosis subgroup devoid of CNAs. Trans-acting aberration hotspots were found to modulate subgroup-specific gene networks, including a TCR deletion-mediated adaptive immune response in the ‘CNA-devoid’ subgroup and a basal-specific chromosome 5 deletion-associated mitotic network. Our results provide a novel molecular stratification of the breast cancer population, derived from the impact of somatic CNAs on the transcriptome.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 173 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 3,207 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 74 2%
United Kingdom 36 1%
Canada 13 <1%
Spain 11 <1%
France 8 <1%
Japan 7 <1%
Denmark 7 <1%
Brazil 7 <1%
Netherlands 6 <1%
Other 49 2%
Unknown 2989 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 779 24%
Researcher 743 23%
Student > Master 328 10%
Student > Bachelor 228 7%
Other 168 5%
Other 569 18%
Unknown 392 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1063 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 676 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 506 16%
Computer Science 164 5%
Engineering 62 2%
Other 287 9%
Unknown 449 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 327. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2022.
All research outputs
#71,876
of 21,224,592 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#5,998
of 87,463 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#272
of 142,156 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#36
of 931 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,224,592 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 87,463 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 96.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 142,156 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 931 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.