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The effect of swimming on oral health status: competitive versus non-competitive athletes

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Applied Oral Science, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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114 Mendeley
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Title
The effect of swimming on oral health status: competitive versus non-competitive athletes
Published in
Journal of Applied Oral Science, April 2016
DOI 10.1590/1678-775720150324
Pubmed ID
Authors

Simonetta D’ERCOLE, Marco TIERI, Diego MARTINELLI, Domenico TRIPODI

Abstract

Young swimmers are particularly susceptible to the onset of oral diseases. Objective To evaluate the oral health status in young competitive and non-competitive swimmers, involving an assessment of salivary cariogenic bacteria and secretory IgA (S-IgA) concentration. Material and Methods Before training sessions (T1), 54 competitive and 69 non-competitive swimmers had the following parameters assessed: decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT), Plaque Index (PlI), and Gingival Index (GI). At T1 and after training sessions (T2), stimulated saliva was collected and microbiological and immunological analyses were performed. Results Competitive swimmers trained 2.02±0.09 hours 5 times a week, while non-competitive swimmers trained 2.03±0.18 hours a week. A total of 14.7% of competitive swimmers suffered dental trauma related to sports. Only 11.76% of the competitive swimmers took a daily dose of fluoride, against 32.65% of non-competitive swimmers (p=0.029). Neither group followed an established diet or presented statistically significant differences in terms of nutritional supplement drink and chocolate intake. There were statistically significant differences in terms of oral hygiene. No significant difference in clinical indexes (DMFT, PlI, and GI) was present. S. mutans was harbored by 18.6% of competitive and the 32.2% of non-competitive swimmers. S. sobrinus was detected in 22.03% of competitive and 91.6% of non-competitive swimmers (p<0.05). S. sanguinis was found only in the saliva of competitive swimmers. The average S-IgA of competitive swimmers decreased significantly at T2 (p<0.05). The pool water had a daily average pH of 7.22. Conclusions Microbial markers, immune status and sporting characteristics are important for establishing guidelines for management of training load in order to minimize physical stress and the risk of oral infection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 114 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 114 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 20 18%
Student > Master 20 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 10%
Student > Postgraduate 9 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 4%
Other 20 18%
Unknown 29 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 49 43%
Sports and Recreations 11 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 3%
Psychology 3 3%
Other 8 7%
Unknown 34 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 April 2016.
All research outputs
#7,311,173
of 13,530,814 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Applied Oral Science
#57
of 202 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#108,210
of 261,540 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Applied Oral Science
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,530,814 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 202 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,540 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them