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The larvicidal effects of black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) and piperine against insecticide resistant and susceptible strains of Anopheles malaria vector mosquitoes

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, April 2016
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Title
The larvicidal effects of black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) and piperine against insecticide resistant and susceptible strains of Anopheles malaria vector mosquitoes
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13071-016-1521-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael Samuel, Shüné V. Oliver, Maureen Coetzee, Basil D. Brooke

Abstract

Insecticide resistance carries the potential to undermine the efficacy of insecticide based malaria vector control strategies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new insecticidal compounds. Black pepper (dried fruit from the vine, Piper nigrum), used as a food additive and spice, and its principal alkaloid piperine, have previously been shown to have larvicidal properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the larvicidal effects of ground black pepper and piperine against third and fourth instar Anopheles larvae drawn from several laboratory-reared insecticide resistant and susceptible strains of Anopheles arabiensis, An. coluzzii, An. gambiae, An. quadriannulatus and An. funestus. Larvae were fed with mixtures of standard larval food and either ground black pepper or piperine in different proportions. Mortality was recorded 24 h after black pepper and 48 h after piperine were applied to the larval bowls. Black pepper and piperine mixtures caused high mortality in the An. gambiae complex strains, with black pepper proving significantly more toxic than piperine. The An. funestus strains were substantially less sensitive to black pepper and piperine which may reflect a marked difference in the feeding habits of this species compared to that of the Gambiae complex or a difference in food metabolism as a consequence of differences in breeding habitat between species. Insecticide resistant and susceptible strains by species proved equally susceptible to black pepper and piperine. It is concluded that black pepper shows potential as a larvicide for the control of certain malaria vector species.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Pakistan 1 1%
Unknown 71 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 25%
Student > Bachelor 15 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 15%
Researcher 5 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 13 18%
Unknown 6 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 33%
Chemistry 16 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 4%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 7 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2016.
All research outputs
#5,510,619
of 7,644,999 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,351
of 2,105 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#171,589
of 266,920 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#118
of 185 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,644,999 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,105 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,920 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 185 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.