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Better than nothing? maternal, newborn, and child health services and perinatal mortality, Lubumbashi, democratic republic of the Congo: a cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, April 2016
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1 tweeter

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116 Mendeley
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Title
Better than nothing? maternal, newborn, and child health services and perinatal mortality, Lubumbashi, democratic republic of the Congo: a cohort study
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-0879-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Abel Mukengeshayi Ntambue, Françoise Kaj Malonga, Michele Dramaix-Wilmet, Roger Nlandu Ngatu, Philippe Donnen

Abstract

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has a high rate of perinatal mortality (PMR), and health measures that could reduce this high rate of mortality are not accessible to all women. Where they are in place, their quality is not optimal. This study was initiated to assess the relationship between these suboptimal maternal, newborn and child health (MNCH) services and perinatal mortality (PM) in Lubumbashi, DRC's second-largest city. We conducted a prospective cohort study, comparing women who had no, low, moderate, or high numbers of antenatal care (ANC) visits; three different levels of delivery care; and who did or did not attend postnatal care (PNC). Women were followed for 50 days after delivery, with PM as the primary endpoint. Uptake of recommended prenatal interventions was between 11-43 % among ANC attenders, regardless of the frequency of their visits. PM was 26 per 1000. ANC attendance was associated with PM. Newborns of mothers who had the lowest attendance had a mortality two times higher than newborns of women who had not attended ANC (low visits: adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 2.2; 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.4-3.8). However, moderate (aOR = 1.4; 95 % CI =0.7-2.2) and high (aOR = 1.3; 95 % CI 0.7-2.2) attendance were not statistically significantly associated with PM. PNC attendance was not significantly associated with lower PM (relative risk 0.4, 95 % CI 0.1-2.6). Emergency obstetric and newborn care (EmONC) was significantly associated with a reduction in mortality (aOR = 0.2; 95 % CI = 0.2-0.8), with an 84.4 % reduction among newborns at risk, and an overall reduction in mortality of 10 % for all births. Perinatal mortality was high among the infants of women in the cohort under study (26 per 1000 live births). Availability of MNCH, specifically EmONC, was associated with lower perinatal mortality, and if this association is causal, might avert 84.4 % of perinatal deaths among newborns at high-risk.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 116 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 116 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 32 28%
Researcher 16 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 11%
Student > Postgraduate 10 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 6%
Other 19 16%
Unknown 19 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 39 34%
Nursing and Health Professions 30 26%
Social Sciences 11 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 2%
Psychology 2 2%
Other 6 5%
Unknown 26 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 April 2016.
All research outputs
#3,941,960
of 7,621,460 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,147
of 1,567 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#144,843
of 266,739 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#52
of 70 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,621,460 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,567 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,739 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 70 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.