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Doctors’ engagements with patient experience surveys in primary and secondary care: a qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in Health Expectations, April 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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44 Mendeley
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Title
Doctors’ engagements with patient experience surveys in primary and secondary care: a qualitative study
Published in
Health Expectations, April 2016
DOI 10.1111/hex.12465
Pubmed ID
Authors

Conor Farrington, Jenni Burt, Olga Boiko, John Campbell, Martin Roland

Abstract

Patient experience surveys are increasingly important in the measurement of, and attempts to improve, health-care quality. To date, little research has focused upon doctors' attitudes to surveys which give them personalized feedback. This paper explores doctors' perceptions of patient experience surveys in primary and secondary care settings in order to deepen understandings of how doctors view the plausibility of such surveys. We conducted a qualitative study with doctors in two regions of England, involving in-depth semi-structured interviews with doctors working in primary care (n = 21) and secondary care (n = 20) settings. The doctors in both settings had recently received individualized feedback from patient experience surveys. Doctors in both settings express strong personal commitments to incorporating patient feedback in quality improvement efforts. However, they also concurrently express strong negative views about the credibility of survey findings and patients' motivations and competence in providing feedback. Thus, individual doctors demonstrate contradictory views regarding the plausibility of patient surveys, leading to complex, varied and on balance negative engagements with patient feedback. Doctors' contradictory views towards patient experience surveys are likely to limit the impact of such surveys in quality improvement initiatives in primary and secondary care. We highlight the need for 'sensegiving' initiatives (i.e. attempts to influence perceptions by communicating particular ideas, narratives and visions) to engage with doctors regarding the plausibility of patient experience surveys. This study highlights the importance of engaging with doctors' views about patient experience surveys when developing quality improvement initiatives.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 43 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 18%
Unspecified 7 16%
Researcher 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 8 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 10 23%
Unspecified 10 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 11%
Social Sciences 4 9%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 7%
Other 12 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 September 2016.
All research outputs
#3,549,840
of 12,353,024 outputs
Outputs from Health Expectations
#368
of 785 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,706
of 273,745 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health Expectations
#28
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,353,024 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 785 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,745 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.