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Cancer Mortality Risks from Long-term Exposure to Ambient Fine Particle

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
18 news outlets
blogs
7 blogs
twitter
27 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
108 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
104 Mendeley
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Title
Cancer Mortality Risks from Long-term Exposure to Ambient Fine Particle
Published in
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, May 2016
DOI 10.1158/1055-9965.epi-15-0626
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chit Ming Wong, Hilda Tsang, Hak Kan Lai, G. Neil Thomas, Kin Bong Lam, King Pan Chan, Qishi Zheng, Jon G. Ayres, Siu Yin Lee, Tai Hing Lam, Thuan Quoc Thach

Abstract

Few studies have assessed long-term effects of particulate matter (PM) with aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 μm (PM2.5) on mortality for causes of cancer other than the lung; we assessed the effects on multiple causes. In Hong Kong, most people live and work in urban or suburban areas with high-rise buildings. This facilitates the estimation of PM2.5 exposure of individuals, taking into account the height of residence above ground level for assessment of the long-term health effects with sufficient statistical power. We recruited 66,820 persons who were ≥65 in 1998 to 2001 and followed up for mortality outcomes until 2011. Annual concentrations of PM at their residential addresses were estimated using PM2.5 concentrations measured at fixed-site monitors, horizontal-vertical locations, and satellite data. We used Cox regression model to assess the HR of mortality for cancer per 10 μg/m(3) increase of PM2.5 RESULTS: PM2.5 was associated with increased risk of mortality for all causes of cancer [HR, 1.22 (95% CI, 1.11-1.34)] and for specific cause of cancer in upper digestive tract [1.42 (1.06-1.89)], digestive accessory organs [1.35 (1.06-1.71)] in all subjects; breast [1.80 (1.26-2.55)] in females; and lung [1.36 (1.05-1.77)] in males. Long-term exposures to PM2.5 are associated with elevated risks of cancer in various organs. This study is particularly timely in China, where compelling evidence is needed to support the pollution control policy to ameliorate the health damages associated with economic growth. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(5); 839-45. ©2016 AACR.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 27 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 104 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 103 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 18%
Student > Master 17 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 12%
Student > Bachelor 7 7%
Other 15 14%
Unknown 21 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 18%
Environmental Science 13 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 6%
Engineering 5 5%
Other 21 20%
Unknown 32 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 201. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 May 2022.
All research outputs
#141,736
of 21,371,670 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#53
of 4,333 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,118
of 279,265 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#2
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,371,670 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,333 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,265 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.