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Eliciting parental support for the use of newborn blood spots for pediatric research

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Research Methodology, February 2016
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Title
Eliciting parental support for the use of newborn blood spots for pediatric research
Published in
BMC Medical Research Methodology, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12874-016-0120-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Edwina H. Yeung, Germaine Buck Louis, David Lawrence, Kurunthachalam Kannan, Alexander C. McLain, Michele Caggana, Charlotte Druschel, Erin Bell

Abstract

Biomarkers of exposures such as infection or environmental chemicals can be measured in small volumes of blood extracted from newborn dried blood spots (DBS) underscoring their potential utility for population-based research. However, few studies have evaluated the feasibility and utility of this resource; particularly the factors associated with parental consent, and the ability to retrieve banked samples with sufficient remaining volume for epidemiologic research. At 8 months postpartum, 5,034 mothers of infants born (2008-2010) in New York (57 counties excluding New York City) were asked to consent for the use of residual DBS for the quantification of cytokines and environmental chemicals. Mothers were part of the Upstate KIDS study, a longitudinal birth cohort designed to evaluate child development through 3 years of age. Information on parental and infant characteristics was obtained from birth certificates and maternal report at 4 months postpartum. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with parental consent and with successful retrieval of DBS. Sixty-two percent (n = 3125) of parents consented. Factors significantly associated with consent included non-Hispanic ethnicity (odds ratio 2.04; 95 % CI: 1.43-2.94), parity (1.29; 1.05-1.57), maternal obesity (1.42; 1.11-1.80) and reported alcohol use during pregnancy (1.51; 1.12-2.06). However, these associations corresponded to small absolute differences in proportions (4 to 8 %), suggesting that the two groups remained comparable. Infant characteristics such as preterm delivery did not significantly differ by consent status among singletons and only ventilator use (OR 2.39; 95 % CI: 1.06-5.41) remained borderline significant among twins in adjusted analyses. Among consented infants, 99 % had at least one 3.2 mm punch successfully retrieved for biomarker analyses and 84 % had a full DBS circle available. Parental characteristics varied slightly by consent, and the availability of samples for research purposes was high, demonstrating the feasibility of this resource for population based research.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 35 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 14%
Student > Postgraduate 4 11%
Professor 3 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Other 6 17%
Unknown 7 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 14%
Social Sciences 4 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 9%
Environmental Science 2 6%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 10 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 April 2016.
All research outputs
#5,770,964
of 7,628,277 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Research Methodology
#644
of 793 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#186,497
of 266,355 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Research Methodology
#26
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,628,277 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 793 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,355 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.