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Response of the brain to enrichment

Overview of attention for article published in Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências, June 2001
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#3 of 262)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
15 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
132 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
164 Mendeley
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Title
Response of the brain to enrichment
Published in
Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências, June 2001
DOI 10.1590/s0001-37652001000200006
Pubmed ID
Authors

MARIAN C. DIAMOND

Abstract

Before 1960, the brain was considered by scientists to be immutable, subject only to genetic control. In the early sixties, however, investigators were seriously speculating that environmental influences might be capable of altering brain structure. By 1964, two research laboratories proved that the morphology and chemistry or physiology of the brain could be experientially altered (Bennett et al. 1964, Hubel and Wiesel 1965). Since then, the capacity of the brain to respond to environmental input, specifically "enrichment," has become an accepted fact among neuroscientists, educators and others. In fact, the demonstration that environmental enrichment can modify structural components of the rat brain at any age altered prevailing presumptions about the brain's plasticity (Diamond et al. 1964, Diamond 1988). The cerebral cortex, the area associated with higher cognitive processing, is more receptive than other parts of the brain to environmental enrichment. The message is clear: Although the brain possesses a relatively constant macro structural organization, the ever-changing cerebral cortex, with its complex microarchitecture of unknown potential, is powerfully shaped by experiences before birth, during youth and, in fact, throughout life. It is essential to note that enrichment effects on the brain have consequences on behavior. Parents, educators, policy makers, and individuals can all benefit from such knowledge.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 164 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 2%
Brazil 3 2%
Spain 2 1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 152 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 18%
Student > Bachelor 28 17%
Student > Master 25 15%
Researcher 23 14%
Professor 17 10%
Other 26 16%
Unknown 15 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 38 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 36 22%
Neuroscience 25 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 6%
Social Sciences 10 6%
Other 24 15%
Unknown 21 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 140. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 June 2021.
All research outputs
#209,843
of 20,765,300 outputs
Outputs from Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências
#3
of 262 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,721
of 277,485 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,765,300 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 262 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,485 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them