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Nitrogen enrichment regulates calcium sources in forests

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, June 2016
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1 tweeter

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48 Mendeley
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Title
Nitrogen enrichment regulates calcium sources in forests
Published in
Global Change Biology, June 2016
DOI 10.1111/gcb.13335
Pubmed ID
Authors

Justin D. Hynicka, Julie C. Pett-Ridge, Steven S. Perakis

Abstract

Nitrogen (N) is a key nutrient that shapes cycles of other essential elements in forests, including calcium (Ca). When N availability exceeds ecosystem demands, excess N can stimulate Ca leaching and deplete available Ca from soils. Over the long term, these processes may alter the proportion of available Ca that is derived from atmospheric deposition versus bedrock weathering, which has fundamental consequences for ecosystem properties and nutrient supply. We evaluated how landscape variation in soil N, reflecting long-term legacies of biological N fixation, influenced plant and soil Ca availability and ecosystem Ca sources across 22 temperate forests in Oregon. We also examined interactions between soil N and bedrock Ca content using soil N gradients on contrasting basaltic versus sedimentary bedrock that differed 16-fold in underlying Ca content. We found that low-N forests on Ca-rich basaltic bedrock relied strongly on Ca from weathering, but that soil N enrichment depleted readily weatherable mineral Ca and shifted forest reliance towards atmospheric Ca. Forests on Ca-poor sedimentary bedrock relied more consistently on atmospheric Ca across all levels of soil N enrichment. The broad importance of atmospheric Ca was unexpected given active regional uplift and erosion that are thought to rejuvenate weathering supply of soil minerals. Despite different patterns of Ca sources to forests on basaltic versus sedimentary bedrock, we observed consistent declines in plant and soil Ca availability with increasing N, regardless of the Ca content of underlying bedrock. Thus, traditional measures of Ca availability in foliage and soil exchangeable pools may poorly reflect long-term Ca sources that sustain soil fertility. We conclude that long-term soil N enrichment can deplete available Ca and cause forests to rely increasingly on Ca from atmospheric deposition, which may limit ecosystem Ca supply in an increasingly N-rich world. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
Belgium 1 2%
Slovenia 1 2%
Unknown 44 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 25%
Researcher 11 23%
Student > Master 9 19%
Professor 4 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 6%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 2 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 18 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 29%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 9 19%
Computer Science 1 2%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 4 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 May 2016.
All research outputs
#9,863,912
of 12,353,915 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#3,111
of 3,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#190,669
of 273,273 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#127
of 132 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,353,915 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,359 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.2. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,273 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 132 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.