↓ Skip to main content

Elevated Bladder Cancer in Northern New England: The Role of Drinking Water and Arsenic

Overview of attention for article published in JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, May 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
19 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
40 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
38 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Elevated Bladder Cancer in Northern New England: The Role of Drinking Water and Arsenic
Published in
JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, May 2016
DOI 10.1093/jnci/djw099
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dalsu Baris, Richard Waddell, Laura E. Beane Freeman, Molly Schwenn, Joanne S. Colt, Joseph D. Ayotte, Mary H. Ward, John Nuckols, Alan Schned, Brian Jackson, Castine Clerkin, Nathaniel Rothman, Lee E. Moore, Anne Taylor, Gilpin Robinson, GM Monawar Hosain, Karla R. Armenti, Richard McCoy, Claudine Samanic, Robert N. Hoover, Joseph F. Fraumeni, Alison Johnson, Margaret R. Karagas, Debra T. Silverman

Abstract

Bladder cancer mortality rates have been elevated in northern New England for at least five decades. Incidence rates in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont are about 20% higher than the United States overall. We explored reasons for this excess, focusing on arsenic in drinking water from private wells, which are particularly prevalent in the region. In a population-based case-control study in these three states, 1213 bladder cancer case patients and 1418 control subjects provided information on suspected risk factors. Log transformed arsenic concentrations were estimated by linear regression based on measurements in water samples from current and past homes. All statistical tests were two-sided. Bladder cancer risk increased with increasing water intake (Ptrend = .003). This trend was statistically significant among participants with a history of private well use (Ptrend = .01). Among private well users, this trend was apparent if well water was derived exclusively from shallow dug wells (which are vulnerable to contamination from manmade sources, Ptrend = .002) but not if well water was supplied only by deeper drilled wells (Ptrend = .48). If dug wells were used pre-1960, when arsenical pesticides were widely used in the region, heavier water consumers (>2.2 L/day) had double the risk of light users (<1.1 L/day, Ptrend = .01). Among all participants, cumulative arsenic exposure from all water sources, lagged 40 years, yielded a positive risk gradient (Ptrend = .004); among the highest-exposed participants (97.5th percentile), risk was twice that of the lowest-exposure quartile (odds ratio = 2.24, 95% confidence interval = 1.29 to 3.89). Our findings support an association between low-to-moderate levels of arsenic in drinking water and bladder cancer risk in New England. In addition, historical consumption of water from private wells, particularly dug wells in an era when arsenical pesticides were widely used, was associated with increased bladder cancer risk and may have contributed to the New England excess.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 18%
Unspecified 6 16%
Student > Postgraduate 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Other 9 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 13 34%
Environmental Science 7 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Other 7 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 168. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 March 2018.
All research outputs
#74,166
of 12,673,944 outputs
Outputs from JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute
#70
of 6,295 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,280
of 261,484 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute
#3
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,673,944 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,295 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,484 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.