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Efficacy and safety of proton pump inhibitors for stress ulcer prophylaxis in critically ill patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
2 policy sources
twitter
55 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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91 Dimensions

Readers on

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229 Mendeley
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Title
Efficacy and safety of proton pump inhibitors for stress ulcer prophylaxis in critically ill patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials
Published in
Critical Care, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13054-016-1305-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fayez Alshamsi, Emilie Belley-Cote, Deborah Cook, Saleh A. Almenawer, Zuhoor Alqahtani, Dan Perri, Lehana Thabane, Awad Al-Omari, Kim Lewis, Gordon Guyatt, Waleed Alhazzani

Abstract

The relative efficacy and safety of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) compared to histamine-2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs) should guide their use in reducing bleeding risk in the critically ill. We searched the Cochrane library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, ACPJC, clinical trials registries, and conference proceedings through November 2015 without language or publication date restrictions. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of PPIs vs H2RAs for stress ulcer prophylaxis in critically ill adults for clinically important bleeding, overt gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, nosocomial pneumonia, mortality, ICU length of stay and Clostridium difficile infection were included. We used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach to assess our confidence in the evidence for each outcome. In 19 trials enrolling 2117 patients, PPIs were more effective than H2RAs in reducing the risk of clinically important GI bleeding (RR 0.39; 95 % CI 0.21, 0.71; P = 0.002; I (2)  = 0 %, moderate confidence) and overt GI bleeding (RR 0.48; 95 % CI 0.34, 0.66; P < 0.0001; I (2)  = 3 %, moderate confidence). PPI use did not significantly affect risk of pneumonia (RR 1.12; 95 % CI 0.86, 1.46; P = 0.39; I (2)  = 2 %, low confidence), mortality (RR 1.05; 95 % CI 0.87, 1.27; P = 0.61; I (2)  = 0 %, moderate confidence), or ICU length of stay (mean difference (MD), -0.38 days; 95 % CI -1.49, 0.74; P = 0.51; I (2)  = 30 %, low confidence). No RCT reported Clostridium difficile infection. PPIs were superior to H2RAs in preventing clinically important and overt GI bleeding, without significantly increasing the risk of pneumonia or mortality. Their impact on Clostridium difficile infection is yet to be determined.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 55 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 229 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Unknown 224 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 41 18%
Researcher 26 11%
Other 25 11%
Student > Bachelor 25 11%
Student > Postgraduate 20 9%
Other 50 22%
Unknown 42 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 92 40%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 51 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 2%
Other 15 7%
Unknown 48 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 38. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 March 2022.
All research outputs
#858,396
of 21,754,345 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#699
of 5,873 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,576
of 279,663 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#5
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,754,345 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,873 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,663 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.