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Methods for selection of Daphnia resting eggs: the influence of manual decapsulation and sodium hypoclorite solution on hatching rates

Overview of attention for article published in Brazilian Journal of Biology = Revista Brasileira de Biologia, May 2016
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  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#46 of 113)

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1 tweeter

Citations

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1 Dimensions

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24 Mendeley
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Title
Methods for selection of Daphnia resting eggs: the influence of manual decapsulation and sodium hypoclorite solution on hatching rates
Published in
Brazilian Journal of Biology = Revista Brasileira de Biologia, May 2016
DOI 10.1590/1519-6984.09415
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paes, T A S V, Rietzler, A C, Maia-Barbosa, P M

Abstract

Cladocerans are able to produce resting eggs inside a protective resistant capsule, the ephippium, that difficults the visualization of the resting eggs, because of the dark pigmentation. Therefore, before hatching experiments, methods to verify viable resting eggs in ephippia must be considered. This study aimed to evaluate the number of eggs per ephippium of Daphnia from two tropical aquatic ecosystems and the efficiency of some methods for decapsulating resting eggs. To evaluate the influence of methods on hatching rates, three different conditions were tested: immersion in sodium hypochlorite, manually decapsulated resting eggs and intact ephippia. The immersion in hypochlorite solution could evaluate differences in numbers of resting eggs per ephippium between the ecosystems studied. The exposure to sodium hypochlorite at a concentration of 2% for 20 minutes was the most efficient method for visual evaluation and isolation of the resting eggs. Hatching rate experiments with resting eggs not isolated from ephippia were underestimated (11.1 ± 5.0%), showing the need of methods to quantify and isolate viable eggs. There were no differences between the hatching rate of resting eggs submitted to hypochlorite solution (47.2 ± 7.34%) and manually decapsulated (53.7 ± 13.24%). However, the immersion in hypochlorite was a more efficient technique, faster and not requiring manual ability.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 17%
Student > Bachelor 1 4%
Unknown 19 79%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 2 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Unknown 19 79%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 May 2016.
All research outputs
#5,791,851
of 7,657,182 outputs
Outputs from Brazilian Journal of Biology = Revista Brasileira de Biologia
#46
of 113 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#186,670
of 266,429 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brazilian Journal of Biology = Revista Brasileira de Biologia
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,657,182 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 113 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 0.8. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,429 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them