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Physician-facilitated designation of proxy decision-makers: family physician perceptions

Overview of attention for article published in Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, April 2016
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1 tweeter

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Title
Physician-facilitated designation of proxy decision-makers: family physician perceptions
Published in
Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13584-016-0059-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gideon Lifshitz, Matan J. Cohen, Hila Shmilovitz, Mayer Brezis, Amnon Lahad, Arie Ben-Yehuda

Abstract

Among the challenges encountered during the care of patients at the end-of-life (EOL), eliciting preferences of patients with whom there is no ability to communicate is common and stressful for all those concerned and charged with patient care. Legal facilities available include patient delegation of proxy decision-makers (PDM) prior to communication incapacity. We sought to estimate family physician awareness and attitude with regard to these aspects of patient care. A telephone survey of family physicians in the Jerusalem, Israel, district using a standard questionnaire. 74 family physicians responded to the survey. The response rate was 42 % and the cooperation rate was 66 %. Most of the respondents, (64 %), reported knowing that the PDM delegation facility exists, though only 24 % claimed to have suggested to their patients that they consider this option. Approximately three-quarters, (78 %), treat patients with whom they discussed other aspects of severe disease, disability or EOL. None of the physicians working predominantly with religiously observant groups reported suggesting PDM delegation. There is an apparent gap between family physician knowledge and their performance to empower the persistence of patient autonomy, should communication ability cease. System-wide interventions to increase EOL communication skills, starting at medical school and henceforth, are necessary in order to promote better EOL care and meaningful resource use.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 6%
Unknown 16 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 41%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 29%
Researcher 2 12%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 41%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 12%
Psychology 2 12%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 6%
Social Sciences 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 3 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 May 2016.
All research outputs
#6,626,071
of 7,657,182 outputs
Outputs from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#156
of 194 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#223,004
of 266,428 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#7
of 10 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 194 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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