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Differential expression of conserved and novel microRNAs during tail regeneration in the lizard Anolis carolinensis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#6 of 6,791)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

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15 news outlets
twitter
21 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
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Title
Differential expression of conserved and novel microRNAs during tail regeneration in the lizard Anolis carolinensis
Published in
BMC Genomics, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12864-016-2640-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elizabeth D. Hutchins, Walter L. Eckalbar, Justin M. Wolter, Marco Mangone, Kenro Kusumi

Abstract

Lizards are evolutionarily the most closely related vertebrates to humans that can lose and regrow an entire appendage. Regeneration in lizards involves differential expression of hundreds of genes that regulate wound healing, musculoskeletal development, hormonal response, and embryonic morphogenesis. While microRNAs are able to regulate large groups of genes, their role in lizard regeneration has not been investigated. MicroRNA sequencing of green anole lizard (Anolis carolinensis) regenerating tail and associated tissues revealed 350 putative novel and 196 known microRNA precursors. Eleven microRNAs were differentially expressed between the regenerating tail tip and base during maximum outgrowth (25 days post autotomy), including miR-133a, miR-133b, and miR-206, which have been reported to regulate regeneration and stem cell proliferation in other model systems. Three putative novel differentially expressed microRNAs were identified in the regenerating tail tip. Differentially expressed microRNAs were identified in the regenerating lizard tail, including known regulators of stem cell proliferation. The identification of 3 putative novel microRNAs suggests that regulatory networks, either conserved in vertebrates and previously uncharacterized or specific to lizards, are involved in regeneration. These findings suggest that differential regulation of microRNAs may play a role in coordinating the timing and expression of hundreds of genes involved in regeneration.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 4%
Unknown 23 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 21%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 13%
Researcher 3 13%
Other 2 8%
Other 5 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 42%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 25%
Unspecified 3 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 8%
Psychology 1 4%
Other 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 133. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 May 2016.
All research outputs
#79,580
of 11,338,088 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#6
of 6,791 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,427
of 275,625 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#1
of 198 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,338,088 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,791 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,625 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 198 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.