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Has the incidence of brain cancer risen in Australia since the introduction of mobile phones 29 years ago?

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Epidemiology, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 626)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
94 news outlets
blogs
8 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
160 tweeters
facebook
15 Facebook pages
googleplus
5 Google+ users
reddit
2 Redditors
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
67 Mendeley
Title
Has the incidence of brain cancer risen in Australia since the introduction of mobile phones 29 years ago?
Published in
Cancer Epidemiology, June 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.canep.2016.04.010
Pubmed ID
Authors

Simon Chapman, Lamiae Azizi, Qingwei Luo, Freddy Sitas

Abstract

Mobile phone use in Australia has increased rapidly since its introduction in 1987 with whole population usage being 94% by 2014. We explored the popularly hypothesised association between brain cancer incidence and mobile phone use. Using national cancer registration data, we examined age and gender specific incidence rates of 19,858 male and 14,222 females diagnosed with brain cancer in Australia between 1982 and 2012, and mobile phone usage data from 1987 to 2012. We modelled expected age specific rates (20-39, 40-59, 60-69, 70-84 years), based on published reports of relative risks (RR) of 1.5 in ever-users of mobile phones, and RR of 2.5 in a proportion of 'heavy users' (19% of all users), assuming a 10-year lag period between use and incidence. Age adjusted brain cancer incidence rates (20-84 years, per 100,000) have risen slightly in males (p<0.05) but were stable over 30 years in females (p>0.05) and are higher in males 8.7 (CI=8.1-9.3) than in females, 5.8 (CI=5.3-6.3). Assuming a causal RR of 1.5 and 10-year lag period, the expected incidence rate in males in 2012 would be 11.7 (11-12.4) and in females 7.7 (CI=7.2-8.3), both p<0.01; 1434 cases observed in 2012, vs. 1867 expected. Significant increases in brain cancer incidence were observed (in keeping with modelled rates) only in those aged ≥70 years (both sexes), but the increase in incidence in this age group began from 1982, before the introduction of mobile phones. Modelled expected incidence rates were higher in all age groups in comparison to what was observed. Assuming a causal RR of 2.5 among 'heavy users' gave 2038 expected cases in all age groups. This is an ecological trends analysis, with no data on individual mobile phone use and outcome. The observed stability of brain cancer incidence in Australia between 1982 and 2012 in all age groups except in those over 70 years compared to increasing modelled expected estimates, suggests that the observed increases in brain cancer incidence in the older age group are unlikely to be related to mobile phone use. Rather, we hypothesize that the observed increases in brain cancer incidence in Australia are related to the advent of improved diagnostic procedures when computed tomography and related imaging technologies were introduced in the early 1980s.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Belgium 1 1%
Unknown 65 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 15 22%
Student > Master 11 16%
Researcher 9 13%
Other 8 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 10%
Other 17 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 25%
Unspecified 11 16%
Engineering 8 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 9%
Environmental Science 6 9%
Other 19 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 917. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 April 2019.
All research outputs
#4,403
of 13,094,010 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Epidemiology
#1
of 626 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#196
of 263,054 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Epidemiology
#1
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,094,010 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 626 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,054 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.