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The development, design, testing, refinement, simulation and application of an evaluation framework for communities of practice and social-professional networks

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, September 2009
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1 tweeter

Citations

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34 Dimensions

Readers on

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111 Mendeley
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Title
The development, design, testing, refinement, simulation and application of an evaluation framework for communities of practice and social-professional networks
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, September 2009
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-9-162
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jeffrey Braithwaite, Johanna I Westbrook, Geetha Ranmuthugala, Frances Cunningham, Jennifer Plumb, Janice Wiley, Dianne Ball, Sue Huckson, Cliff Hughes, Brian Johnston, Joanne Callen, Nerida Creswick, Andrew Georgiou, Luc Betbeder-Matibet, Deborah Debono

Abstract

Communities of practice and social-professional networks are generally considered to enhance workplace experience and enable organizational success. However, despite the remarkable growth in interest in the role of collaborating structures in a range of industries, there is a paucity of empirical research to support this view. Nor is there a convincing model for their systematic evaluation, despite the significant potential benefits in answering the core question: how well do groups of professionals work together and how could they be organised to work together more effectively? This research project will produce a rigorous evaluation methodology and deliver supporting tools for the benefit of researchers, policymakers, practitioners and consumers within the health system and other sectors. Given the prevalence and importance of communities of practice and social networks, and the extent of investments in them, this project represents a scientific innovation of national and international significance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 111 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
Netherlands 2 2%
Spain 2 2%
Canada 2 2%
Australia 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 100 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 22%
Researcher 21 19%
Student > Master 17 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 10%
Other 8 7%
Other 30 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 24%
Social Sciences 20 18%
Computer Science 10 9%
Unspecified 9 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 8 7%
Other 37 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 April 2012.
All research outputs
#9,905,859
of 12,372,945 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#3,417
of 4,083 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,267
of 117,813 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#28
of 36 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,372,945 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,083 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 117,813 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 36 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.