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The role of active case finding in reducing patient incurred catastrophic costs for tuberculosis in Nepal

Overview of attention for article published in Infectious Diseases of Poverty, December 2019
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#49 of 682)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

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24 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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74 Mendeley
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Title
The role of active case finding in reducing patient incurred catastrophic costs for tuberculosis in Nepal
Published in
Infectious Diseases of Poverty, December 2019
DOI 10.1186/s40249-019-0603-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Suman Chandra Gurung, Kritika Dixit, Bhola Rai, Maxine Caws, Puskar Raj Paudel, Raghu Dhital, Shraddha Acharya, Gangaram Budhathoki, Deepak Malla, Jens W. Levy, Job van Rest, Knut Lönnroth, Kerri Viney, Andrew Ramsay, Tom Wingfield, Buddha Basnyat, Anil Thapa, Bertie Squire, Duolao Wang, Gokul Mishra, Kashim Shah, Anil Shrestha, Noemia Teixeira de Siqueira-Filha

Abstract

The World Health Organization (WHO) End TB Strategy has established a milestone to reduce the number of tuberculosis (TB)- affected households facing catastrophic costs to zero by 2020. The role of active case finding (ACF) in reducing patient costs has not been determined globally. This study therefore aimed to compare costs incurred by TB patients diagnosed through ACF and passive case finding (PCF), and to determine the prevalence and intensity of patient-incurred catastrophic costs in Nepal. The study was conducted in two districts of Nepal: Bardiya and Pyuthan (Province No. 5) between June and August 2018. One hundred patients were included in this study in a 1:1 ratio (PCF: ACF, 25 consecutive ACF and 25 consecutive PCF patients in each district). The WHO TB patient costing tool was applied to collect information from patients or a member of their family regarding indirect and direct medical and non-medical costs. Catastrophic costs were calculated based on the proportion of patients with total costs exceeding 20% of their annual household income. The intensity of catastrophic costs was calculated using the positive overshoot method. The chi-square and Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests were used to compare proportions and costs. Meanwhile, the Mantel Haenszel test was performed to assess the association between catastrophic costs and type of diagnosis. Ninety-nine patients were interviewed (50 ACF and 49 PCF). Patients diagnosed through ACF incurred lower costs during the pre-treatment period (direct medical: USD 14 vs USD 32, P = 0.001; direct non-medical: USD 3 vs USD 10, P = 0.004; indirect, time loss: USD 4 vs USD 13, P <  0.001). The cost of the pre-treatment and intensive phases combined was also lower for direct medical (USD 15 vs USD 34, P = 0.002) and non-medical (USD 30 vs USD 54, P = 0.022) costs among ACF patients. The prevalence of catastrophic direct costs was lower for ACF patients for all thresholds. A lower intensity of catastrophic costs was also documented for ACF patients, although the difference was not statistically significant. ACF can reduce patient-incurred costs substantially, contributing to the End TB Strategy target. Other synergistic policies, such as social protection, will also need to be implemented to reduce catastrophic costs to zero among TB-affected households.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 24 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 74 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 12%
Researcher 7 9%
Student > Bachelor 7 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 5%
Other 13 18%
Unknown 20 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 7%
Social Sciences 4 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 4%
Other 17 23%
Unknown 24 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 February 2021.
All research outputs
#1,298,520
of 17,648,139 outputs
Outputs from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#49
of 682 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,824
of 403,210 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#6
of 74 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,648,139 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 682 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 403,210 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 74 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.