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An evaluation of inorganic toxicity reference values for use in assessing hazards to American robins (Turdus migratorius)

Overview of attention for article published in Integrated Environmental Assessment & Management, July 2016
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Title
An evaluation of inorganic toxicity reference values for use in assessing hazards to American robins (Turdus migratorius)
Published in
Integrated Environmental Assessment & Management, July 2016
DOI 10.1002/ieam.1792
Pubmed ID
Authors

W Nelson Beyer, Bradley E Sample

Abstract

When performing screening level and baseline risk assessments, assessors usually compare estimated exposures of wildlife receptor species to toxicity reference values (TRVs). We modeled the exposure of American robins (Turdus migratorius) to ten elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Pb, Se, Zn and V) in spring and early summer, a time when earthworms are preferred prey. We calculated soil benchmarks associated with possible toxic effects to these robins from six sets of published TRVs. Several of the resulting soil screening level benchmarks were inconsistent with each other and below soil background concentrations. Accordingly, we examined the derivations of the TRVs as a possible source of error. In the case of V, a particularly toxic chemical compound (ammonium vanadate) containing V, not normally present in soil, had been used to estimate a TRV. In the cases of Zn and Cu, use of uncertainty values of ten in estimating TRVs led to implausibly low soil screening values. In the case of Pb, a TRV was calculated from studies demonstrating reductions in egg production in Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) exposed to Pb concentrations well below those causing toxic effects in other species of birds. The results on quail, which were replicated in additional trials, are probably not applicable to other, unrelated species, although we acknowledge that only a small fraction of all species of birds have been tested. These examples underscore the importance of understanding the derivation and relevance of TRVs before selecting them for use in screening or in ecological risk assessment. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 25%
Other 4 20%
Student > Master 3 15%
Student > Bachelor 1 5%
Professor 1 5%
Other 3 15%
Unknown 3 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 10 50%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 15%
Chemistry 2 10%
Psychology 1 5%
Unspecified 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 May 2016.
All research outputs
#12,610,659
of 14,268,610 outputs
Outputs from Integrated Environmental Assessment & Management
#449
of 660 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#219,717
of 262,818 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Integrated Environmental Assessment & Management
#15
of 21 outputs
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