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Isolation of methylmercury using distillation and anion-exchange chromatography for isotopic analyses in natural matrices

Overview of attention for article published in Analytical & Bioanalytical Chemistry, December 2019
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2 tweeters

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5 Mendeley
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Title
Isolation of methylmercury using distillation and anion-exchange chromatography for isotopic analyses in natural matrices
Published in
Analytical & Bioanalytical Chemistry, December 2019
DOI 10.1007/s00216-019-02277-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tylor J. Rosera, Sarah E. Janssen, Michael T. Tate, Ryan F. Lepak, Jacob M. Ogorek, John F. DeWild, Christopher L. Babiarz, David P. Krabbenhoft, James P. Hurley

Abstract

The development of mercury (Hg) stable isotope measurements has enhanced the study of Hg sources and transformations in the environment. As a result of the mixing of inorganic Hg (iHg) and methylmercury (MeHg) species within organisms of the aquatic food web, understanding species-specific Hg stable isotopic compositions is of significant importance. The lack of MeHg isotope measurements is due to the analytical difficulty in the separation of the MeHg from the total Hg pool, with only a few methods having been tested over the past decade with varying degrees of success, and only a handful of environmentally relevant measurements. Here, we present a novel anion-exchange resin separation method using AG 1-X4 that further isolates MeHg from the sample matrix, following a distillation pretreatment, in order to obtain ambient MeHg stable isotopic compositions. This method avoids the use of organic reagents, does not require complex instrumentation, and is applicable across matrices. Separation tests across sediment, water, and biotic matrices showed acceptable recoveries (98 ± 5%, n = 54) and reproducible δ202Hg isotope results (2 SDs ≤ 0.15‰) down to 5 ng of MeHg. The measured MeHg pools in natural matrices, such as plankton and sediments, showed large deviations from the non-speciated total Hg measurement, indicating that there is an important isotopic shift during methylation that is not recorded by typical measurements, but is vital in order to assess sources of Hg during bioaccumulation. Graphical abstract.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 5 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 60%
Researcher 1 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 40%
Chemistry 2 40%
Unknown 1 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 February 2020.
All research outputs
#11,909,803
of 15,606,181 outputs
Outputs from Analytical & Bioanalytical Chemistry
#3,411
of 6,067 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#239,873
of 357,415 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Analytical & Bioanalytical Chemistry
#71
of 164 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,606,181 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,067 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 357,415 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 164 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.