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Saharan dust nutrients promote Vibrio bloom formation in marine surface waters

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
15 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
19 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
52 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
145 Mendeley
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Title
Saharan dust nutrients promote Vibrio bloom formation in marine surface waters
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, May 2016
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1518080113
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jason R. Westrich, Alina M. Ebling, William M. Landing, Jessica L. Joyner, Keri M. Kemp, Dale W. Griffin, Erin K. Lipp

Abstract

Vibrio is a ubiquitous genus of marine bacteria, typically comprising a small fraction of the total microbial community in surface waters, but capable of becoming a dominant taxon in response to poorly characterized factors. Iron (Fe), often restricted by limited bioavailability and low external supply, is an essential micronutrient that can limit Vibrio growth. Vibrio species have robust metabolic capabilities and an array of Fe-acquisition mechanisms, and are able to respond rapidly to nutrient influx, yet Vibrio response to environmental pulses of Fe remains uncharacterized. Here we examined the population growth of Vibrio after natural and simulated pulses of atmospherically transported Saharan dust, an important and episodic source of Fe to tropical marine waters. As a model for opportunistic bacterial heterotrophs, we demonstrated that Vibrio proliferate in response to a broad range of dust-Fe additions at rapid timescales. Within 24 h of exposure, strains of Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio alginolyticus were able to directly use Saharan dust-Fe to support rapid growth. These findings were also confirmed with in situ field studies; arrival of Saharan dust in the Caribbean and subtropical Atlantic coincided with high levels of dissolved Fe, followed by up to a 30-fold increase of culturable Vibrio over background levels within 24 h. The relative abundance of Vibrio increased from ∼1 to ∼20% of the total microbial community. This study, to our knowledge, is the first to describe Vibrio response to Saharan dust nutrients, having implications at the intersection of marine ecology, Fe biogeochemistry, and both human and environmental health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 145 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
Chile 2 1%
Australia 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 134 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 42 29%
Researcher 24 17%
Student > Master 16 11%
Professor 14 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 7%
Other 21 14%
Unknown 18 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 47 32%
Environmental Science 26 18%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 20 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 2%
Other 14 10%
Unknown 24 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 147. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 June 2020.
All research outputs
#169,256
of 18,468,417 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#3,666
of 91,211 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,354
of 272,183 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#123
of 870 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,468,417 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 91,211 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 32.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,183 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 870 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.