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Evaluating the Maintenance of Lifestyle Changes in a Randomized Controlled Trial of the ‘Get Healthy, Stay Healthy’ Program

Overview of attention for article published in JMIR mHealth and uHealth, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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35 Mendeley
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Title
Evaluating the Maintenance of Lifestyle Changes in a Randomized Controlled Trial of the ‘Get Healthy, Stay Healthy’ Program
Published in
JMIR mHealth and uHealth, May 2016
DOI 10.2196/mhealth.5280
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brianna S Fjeldsoe

Abstract

Extending contact with participants after initial, intensive intervention may support maintenance of weight loss and related behaviors. This community-wide trial evaluated a text message (short message service, SMS)-delivered, extended contact intervention ('Get Healthy, Stay Healthy' (GHSH)), which followed on from a population-level, behavioral telephone coaching program. This study employed a parallel, randomized controlled trial: GHSH compared with no continued contact (standard practice). Participants (n=228) were recruited after completing a 6-month lifestyle telephone coaching program: mean age = 53.4 (standard deviation (SD)=12.3) years; 66.7% (152/228) female; mean body mass index (BMI) upon entering GHSH=29.5 kg/m2 (SD = 6.0). Participants received tailored text messages over a 6-month period. The message frequency, timing, and content of the messages was based on participant preference, ascertained during two tailoring telephone calls. Primary outcomes of body weight, waist circumference, physical activity (walking, moderate, and vigorous sessions/week), and dietary behaviors (fruit and vegetable serves/day, cups of sweetened drinks per day, takeaway meals per week; fat, fiber and total indices from the Fat and Fiber Behavior Questionnaire) were assessed via self-report before (baseline) and after (6-months) extended contact (with moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) also assessed via accelerometry). Significant intervention effects, all favoring the intervention group, were observed at 6-months for change in weight (-1.35 kg, 95% confidence interval (CI): -2.24, -0.46, P=.003), weekly moderate physical activity sessions (0.56 sessions/week, 95% CI: 0.15, 0.96, P=.008) and accelerometer-assessed MVPA (24.16 minutes/week, 95% CI: 5.07, 43.25, P=.007). Waist circumference, other physical activity outcomes and dietary outcomes, did not differ significantly between groups. The GHSH extended care intervention led to significantly better anthropometric and physical activity outcomes than standard practice (no contact). This evidence is useful for scaling up the delivery of GHSH as standard practice following the population-level telephone coaching program.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Tunisia 1 3%
Unknown 34 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 26%
Researcher 8 23%
Unspecified 3 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Other 2 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 8 23%
Social Sciences 7 20%
Unspecified 5 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 11%
Sports and Recreations 3 9%
Other 8 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 June 2016.
All research outputs
#2,564,662
of 10,533,845 outputs
Outputs from JMIR mHealth and uHealth
#449
of 578 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,432
of 275,717 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JMIR mHealth and uHealth
#35
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,533,845 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 578 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.1. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,717 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 50 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.