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Neighbourhood socioeconomic context, individual socioeconomic position, and overweight in young children: a multilevel study in a large German city

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Obesity, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#29 of 182)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

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17 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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36 Mendeley
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Title
Neighbourhood socioeconomic context, individual socioeconomic position, and overweight in young children: a multilevel study in a large German city
Published in
BMC Obesity, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40608-016-0106-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Steffen Andreas Schüle, Rüdiger von Kries, Hermann Fromme, Gabriele Bolte

Abstract

The context of the close neighbourhood environment in which children live has gained increasing attention in epidemiological research. This study aimed to investigate if contextual neighbourhood socioeconomic position (SEP) was independently associated with overweight in young children aged 5-7 years while simultaneously considering a wide range of individual socioeconomic determinants and known risk factors for overweight. Objectively measured body mass index (BMI) data from 3499 children (53 % boys and 47 % girls) from three surveys between 2004 and 2007 clustered in 18 school enrolment zones in the city of Munich, Germany, were analysed with hierarchical logistic regression models. An index of neighbourhood SEP was calculated with principal component analysis using aggregated data. Individual socioeconomic data, maternal BMI, and birth weight were collected with parental questionnaires. We analysed how much of the between neighbourhood variance of overweight was attributable to individual factors and how much was explained by neighbourhood SEP. The prevalence of overweight, including obesity, was 14.1 %. In the final adjusted model low neighbourhood SEP was independently associated with overweight (odds ratio (OR) = 1.42, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.00-2.00) compared to high neighbourhood SEP. On the individual level low parental education (OR = 1.99, 95 % CI = 1.49-2.65) or middle parental education (OR = 1.50, 95 % CI = 1.16-1.95) compared to high parental education and nationality of the child other than German (OR = 1.53, 95 % CI = 1.17-1.99) compared to German nationality were independently associated with overweight. Whereas individual determinants were the main drivers in explaining between neighbourhood variance, neighbourhood SEP additionally explained differences in overweight between neighbourhoods. Thus, considering neighbourhood context in intervention planning could result in more effective strategies compared to measures only focusing on individual determinants of overweight.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 3%
Unknown 35 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 22%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 3 8%
Student > Master 3 8%
Other 6 17%
Unknown 9 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 6 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 11%
Psychology 3 8%
Mathematics 2 6%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 12 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 October 2016.
All research outputs
#1,326,236
of 13,190,464 outputs
Outputs from BMC Obesity
#29
of 182 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,861
of 264,083 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Obesity
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,190,464 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 182 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,083 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them