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Genomics reveals historic and contemporary transmission dynamics of a bacterial disease among wildlife and livestock

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
30 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
63 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
174 Mendeley
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Title
Genomics reveals historic and contemporary transmission dynamics of a bacterial disease among wildlife and livestock
Published in
Nature Communications, May 2016
DOI 10.1038/ncomms11448
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pauline L. Kamath, Jeffrey T. Foster, Kevin P. Drees, Gordon Luikart, Christine Quance, Neil J. Anderson, P. Ryan Clarke, Eric K. Cole, Mark L. Drew, William H. Edwards, Jack C. Rhyan, John J. Treanor, Rick L. Wallen, Patrick J. White, Suelee Robbe-Austerman, Paul C. Cross

Abstract

Whole-genome sequencing has provided fundamental insights into infectious disease epidemiology, but has rarely been used for examining transmission dynamics of a bacterial pathogen in wildlife. In the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE), outbreaks of brucellosis have increased in cattle along with rising seroprevalence in elk. Here we use a genomic approach to examine Brucella abortus evolution, cross-species transmission and spatial spread in the GYE. We find that brucellosis was introduced into wildlife in this region at least five times. The diffusion rate varies among Brucella lineages (∼3 to 8 km per year) and over time. We also estimate 12 host transitions from bison to elk, and 5 from elk to bison. Our results support the notion that free-ranging elk are currently a self-sustaining brucellosis reservoir and the source of livestock infections, and that control measures in bison are unlikely to affect the dynamics of unrelated strains circulating in nearby elk populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 30 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 174 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 3%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 165 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 39 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 18%
Student > Master 21 12%
Student > Bachelor 20 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 6%
Other 29 17%
Unknown 24 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 67 39%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 18 10%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 15 9%
Environmental Science 14 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 6%
Other 18 10%
Unknown 32 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 47. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 July 2019.
All research outputs
#547,098
of 17,360,236 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#9,349
of 34,118 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,257
of 270,179 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#111
of 353 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,360,236 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 34,118 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 51.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,179 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 353 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.