↓ Skip to main content

Does neighborhood fast-food outlet exposure amplify inequalities in diet and obesity? A cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, May 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
22 news outlets
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
40 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
44 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
159 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Does neighborhood fast-food outlet exposure amplify inequalities in diet and obesity? A cross-sectional study
Published in
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, May 2016
DOI 10.3945/ajcn.115.128132
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas Burgoine, Nita G Forouhi, Simon J Griffin, Søren Brage, Nicholas J Wareham, Pablo Monsivais

Abstract

Greater exposures to fast-food outlets and lower levels of education are independently associated with less healthy diets and obesity. Little is known about the interplay between these environmental and individual factors. The purpose of this study was to test whether observed differences in fast-food consumption and obesity by fast-food outlet exposure are moderated by educational attainment. In a population-based cohort of 5958 adults aged 29-62 y in Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom, we used educational attainment-stratified regression models to estimate the food-frequency questionnaire-derived consumption of energy-dense "fast foods" (g/d) typically sold in fast-food restaurants and measured body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)) across geographic information system-derived home and work fast-food exposure quartiles. We used logistic regression to estimate the odds of obesity (BMI ≥30) and calculated relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) on an additive scale. Participant data were collected during 2005-2013 and analyzed in 2015. Greater fast-food consumption, BMI, and odds of obesity were associated with greater fast-food outlet exposure and a lower educational level. Fast-food consumption and BMI were significantly different across education groups at all levels of fast-food outlet exposure (P < 0.05). High fast-food outlet exposure amplified differences in fast-food consumption across levels of education. The relation between fast-food outlet exposure and obesity was only significant among those who were least educated (OR: 2.05; 95% CI: 1.08, 3.87; RERI = 0.88), which suggested a positive additive interaction between education and fast-food outlet exposure. These findings suggest that efforts to improve diets and health through neighborhood-level fast-food outlet regulation might be effective across socioeconomic groups and may serve to reduce observed socioeconomic inequalities in diet and obesity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 40 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 159 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Unknown 156 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 36 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 18%
Student > Bachelor 24 15%
Researcher 21 13%
Unspecified 15 9%
Other 34 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 31 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 29 18%
Unspecified 26 16%
Social Sciences 22 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 6%
Other 41 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 194. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 November 2018.
All research outputs
#71,533
of 13,756,934 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
#263
of 9,417 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,823
of 262,462 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
#6
of 79 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,756,934 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,417 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,462 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 79 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.