↓ Skip to main content

Marked changes in neuropeptide expression accompany broadcast spawnings in the gastropod Haliotis asinina

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Zoology, May 2012
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
46 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Marked changes in neuropeptide expression accompany broadcast spawnings in the gastropod Haliotis asinina
Published in
Frontiers in Zoology, May 2012
DOI 10.1186/1742-9994-9-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Patrick S York, Scott F Cummins, Sandie M Degnan, Ben J Woodcroft, Bernard M Degnan, York PS, Cummins SF, Degnan SM, Woodcroft BJ, Degnan BM

Abstract

A huge diversity of marine species reproduce by synchronously spawning their gametes into the water column. Although this species-specific event typically occurs in a particular season, the precise time and day of spawning often can not be predicted. There is little understanding of how the environment (e.g. water temperature, day length, tidal and lunar cycle) regulates a population's reproductive physiology to synchronise a spawning event. The Indo-Pacific tropical abalone, Haliotis asinina, has a highly predictable spawning cycle, where individuals release gametes on the evenings of spring high tides on new and full moons during the warmer half of the year. These calculable spawning events uniquely allow for the analysis of the molecular and cellular processes underlying reproduction. Here we characterise neuropeptides produced in H. asinina ganglia that are known in egg-laying molluscs to control vital aspects of reproduction.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Uruguay 1 2%
Unknown 44 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 24%
Student > Master 11 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 11%
Professor 3 7%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 4 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 57%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 11%
Environmental Science 3 7%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Computer Science 2 4%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 4 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 May 2012.
All research outputs
#5,815,404
of 6,799,894 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Zoology
#312
of 332 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#73,261
of 90,091 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Zoology
#6
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,799,894 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 332 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 90,091 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.