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Fast skeletal muscle transcriptome of the Gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) determined by next generation sequencing

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, January 2012
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter

Citations

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42 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
71 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Fast skeletal muscle transcriptome of the Gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) determined by next generation sequencing
Published in
BMC Genomics, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/1471-2164-13-181
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel Garcia de la serrana, Alicia Estévez, Karl Andree, Ian A Johnston

Abstract

The gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata L.) occurs around the Mediterranean and along Eastern Atlantic coasts from Great Britain to Senegal. It is tolerant of a wide range of temperatures and salinities and is often found in brackish coastal lagoons and estuarine areas, particularly early in its life cycle. Gilthead sea bream are extensively cultivated in the Mediterranean with an annual production of 125,000 metric tonnes. Here we present a de novo assembly of the fast skeletal muscle transcriptome of gilthead sea bream using 454 reads and identify gene paralogues, splice variants and microsatellite repeats. An annotated transcriptome of the skeletal muscle will facilitate understanding of the genetic and molecular basis of traits linked to production in this economically important species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Chile 1 1%
Unknown 65 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 23 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 25%
Student > Master 7 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 11 15%
Unknown 2 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 55 77%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 8%
Environmental Science 3 4%
Computer Science 1 1%
Social Sciences 1 1%
Other 1 1%
Unknown 4 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 May 2012.
All research outputs
#7,762,692
of 12,373,620 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#4,640
of 7,313 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#65,470
of 118,795 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#23
of 58 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,620 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,313 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 58 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.