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The effect of high lactose–isomaltulose on cognitive performance of young children. A double blind cross-over design study

Overview of attention for article published in Appetite, February 2012
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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49 Mendeley
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Title
The effect of high lactose–isomaltulose on cognitive performance of young children. A double blind cross-over design study
Published in
Appetite, February 2012
DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2011.09.004
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mohd Nasir Mohd Taib, Zalilah Mohd Shariff, Keith A. Wesnes, Hazizi Abu Saad, Sarina Sariman

Abstract

Changes in blood glucose are hypothesized to influence cognitive performance and these changes can be affected by certain nutrients. This double-blind 4-period cross-over study evaluated the effects of a slow-release modified sucrose (isomaltulose) in combination with a high concentration of lactose on cognitive performance of 5-6 year old children. Thirty children received a standard growing upmilk (Std GUM), reformulated growing up milk (Reform GUM), standard growing up milk with lactose-isomaltulose (Iso GUM), and a standard glucose drink (Glucose). The CDR System, a computerised cognitive assessment system, was used to assess various measures of attention and memory of the children at baseline (T=0), 60 (T=1), 120 (T=2), and 180 (T=3) minutes following the intake of test products. Overall, there was a decline in performance over the morning on almost every cognitive task. Children showed better attention following consumption of Iso GUM compared to Std GUM but attention was not significantly different than Reform GUM and glucose. Also, Iso GUM conferred a beneficial effect over both Reform GUM and glucose on sensitivity index of numeric working memory with no difference observed between Iso GUM and Std GUM. Surprisingly, glucose group showed lowest decline in the sensitivity index of spatial working memory and highest speed in picture recognition, although the latter was significantly better than Reform GUM only. For speed of spatial working memory, Reform GUM had the lowest decline but was significantly different only with Std GUM. There was, however, no significant difference among conditions for continuity of attention, speed of numeric working memory and picture recognition sensitivity. Despite the small sample size, the findings are intriguing as carbohydrate composition seems to influence some aspects of cognitive performance such as attention and memory. However, further studies are needed to confirm these findings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 4%
Japan 1 2%
New Zealand 1 2%
Kenya 1 2%
Unknown 44 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 20%
Researcher 9 18%
Student > Bachelor 7 14%
Student > Master 5 10%
Other 3 6%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 8 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 12%
Psychology 6 12%
Sports and Recreations 2 4%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 12 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 June 2012.
All research outputs
#3,051,580
of 12,213,129 outputs
Outputs from Appetite
#1,386
of 2,897 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,458
of 114,766 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Appetite
#27
of 66 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,213,129 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,897 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 114,766 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 66 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.