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Evidence of Avian and Possum Fecal Contamination in Rainwater Tanks as Determined by Microbial Source Tracking Approaches

Overview of attention for article published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
32 Mendeley
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Title
Evidence of Avian and Possum Fecal Contamination in Rainwater Tanks as Determined by Microbial Source Tracking Approaches
Published in
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, May 2016
DOI 10.1128/aem.00892-16
Pubmed ID
Authors

W. Ahmed, K. A. Hamilton, P. Gyawali, S. Toze, C. N. Haas

Abstract

Avian and possum fecal droppings may negatively impact roof-harvested rainwater (RHRW) water quality due to the presence of zoonotic pathogens. This study was aimed at evaluating the performance characteristics of a possum feces-associated (PSM) marker by screening 210 fecal and wastewater samples from possums (n = 20) and a range of non-possum hosts (n = 190) in Southeast Queensland, Australia. The host-sensitivity and -specificity of the PSM marker were 0.90 and 0.95 (maximum value of 1.00). The mean concentrations of the GFD marker in possum fecal DNA samples (8.8 × 10(7) gene copies per g of feces) were two orders of magnitude higher than non-possum fecal DNA samples (5.0 × 10(5) gene copies per g of feces). The host-sensitivity, -specificity and concentrations of the avian-feces associated GFD marker have been reported in our recent study (Ahmed et al. 2016). The utilities of the GFD and PSM markers were evaluated by testing a large number of tank water samples (n = 134) from the Brisbane and Currumbin areas. GFD and PSM markers were detected in 39 of 134 (29%) and 11 of 134 (8%) tank water samples, respectively. GFD marker in PCR positive samples ranged from 3.7 × 10(2) to 8.5 × 10(5) gene copies per L, whereas the PSM marker ranged from 2.0 × 10(3) to 6.8 × 10(3) gene copies per L of water. The results of this study suggest the presence of fecal contamination in tank water samples from avian and possum hosts. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that established an association between the degradation of microbial tank water quality with avian and possum feces. Based on the results, we recommend disinfection of tank water, especially for tanks designated for potable use. The use of roof-harvested rainwater (RHRW) for domestic purposes is a globally accepted practice. The presence of pathogens in rainwater tanks has been reported by several studies supporting the necessity for the management of potential health risks. The sources of fecal pollution in rainwater tanks are unknown. However, the application of MST markers has the potential to identify the sources of fecal contamination in a rainwater tank. In this study, we provide the evidence of avian and possum fecal contamination in tank water samples using molecular markers. This study established a potential link between the degradation of the microbial quality of tank water with avian and possum feces.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 25%
Unspecified 5 16%
Professor 4 13%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Other 8 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 7 22%
Unspecified 7 22%
Environmental Science 6 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 9%
Other 5 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 October 2017.
All research outputs
#1,179,511
of 12,508,562 outputs
Outputs from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#799
of 9,509 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#35,661
of 264,908 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#36
of 144 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,508,562 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,509 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,908 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 144 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.