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Human newborn bacille Calmette–Guérin vaccination and risk of tuberculosis disease: a case-control study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

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60 Mendeley
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Title
Human newborn bacille Calmette–Guérin vaccination and risk of tuberculosis disease: a case-control study
Published in
BMC Medicine, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12916-016-0617-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Helen A. Fletcher, Ali Filali-Mouhim, Elisa Nemes, Anthony Hawkridge, Alana Keyser, Samuel Njikan, Mark Hatherill, Thomas J. Scriba, Brian Abel, Benjamin M. Kagina, Ashley Veldsman, Nancy Marín Agudelo, Gilla Kaplan, Gregory D. Hussey, Rafick-Pierre Sekaly, Willem A. Hanekom

Abstract

An incomplete understanding of the immunological mechanisms underlying protection against tuberculosis (TB) hampers the development of new vaccines against TB. We aimed to define host correlates of prospective risk of TB disease following bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination. In this study, 5,726 infants vaccinated with BCG at birth were enrolled. Host responses in blood collected at 10 weeks of age were compared between infants who developed pulmonary TB disease during 2 years of follow-up (cases) and those who remained healthy (controls). Comprehensive gene expression and cellular and soluble marker analysis failed to identify a correlate of risk. We showed that distinct host responses after BCG vaccination may be the reason: two major clusters of gene expression, with different myeloid and lymphoid activation and inflammatory patterns, were evident when all infants were examined together. Cases from each cluster demonstrated distinct patterns of gene expression, which were confirmed by cellular assays. Distinct patterns of host responses to Mycobacterium bovis BCG suggest that novel TB vaccines may also elicit distinct patterns of host responses. This diversity should be considered in future TB vaccine development.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 59 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 15%
Student > Master 8 13%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 10 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 20%
Immunology and Microbiology 12 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 7%
Social Sciences 4 7%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 14 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 June 2018.
All research outputs
#3,310,488
of 13,104,802 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#1,483
of 2,087 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#73,035
of 263,640 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,104,802 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,087 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 34.6. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,640 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them