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Impact of menaquinone-4 supplementation on coronary artery calcification and arterial stiffness: an open label single arm study

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition Journal, May 2016
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Title
Impact of menaquinone-4 supplementation on coronary artery calcification and arterial stiffness: an open label single arm study
Published in
Nutrition Journal, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12937-016-0175-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yuji Ikari, Sho Torii, Atsushi Shioi, Toshio Okano

Abstract

Dietary intake of vitamin K has been reported to reduce coronary artery calcification (CAC) and cardiovascular events. However, it is unknown whether supplemental menaquinone (MK)-4 can reduce CAC or arterial stiffness. To study the effect of MK-4 supplementation on CAC and brachial ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). This study is a single arm design to take 45 mg/day MK-4 daily as a therapeutic drug for 1 year. Primary endpoint was CAC score determined using 64-slice multislice CT (Siemens), and the secondary endpoint was baPWV measured before and 1 year after MK-4 therapy. A total of 26 patients were enrolled. The average age was 69 ± 8 years and 65 % were female. Plasma levels of phylloquinone (PK), MK-7, and MK4 were 1.94 ± 1.38 ng/ml, 14.2 ± 11.9 ng/ml and 0.4 ± 2.0 ng/ml, respectively, suggesting that MK-7 was the dominant vitamin K in the studied population. Baseline CAC and baPWV were 513 ± 773 and 1834 ± 289 cm/s, respectively. At 1 year following MK-4 supplementation, the values were 588 ± 872 (+14 %) and 1821 ± 378 cm/s (-0.7 %), respectively. In patients with high PIVKA-2, -18 % annual reduction of baPWV was observed. Despite high dose MK-4 supplementation, CAC increased +14 % annually, but baPWV did not change (-0.7 %). The benefits of MK-4 supplementation were only observed in patients with vitamin K insufficiencies correlated with high PIVKA-2 baseline levels, reducing baPWV but not CAC. This study was registered as UMIN 000002760.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 39%
Student > Master 6 21%
Student > Bachelor 4 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Unspecified 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 2 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 39%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 7%
Engineering 2 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 7%
Other 6 21%
Unknown 3 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 May 2016.
All research outputs
#5,655,579
of 7,822,782 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition Journal
#771
of 884 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#173,065
of 269,710 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition Journal
#23
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,822,782 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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