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Storm-event-transport of urban-use pesticides to streams likely impairs invertebrate assemblages

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Monitoring & Assessment, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#40 of 1,222)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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26 Mendeley
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Title
Storm-event-transport of urban-use pesticides to streams likely impairs invertebrate assemblages
Published in
Environmental Monitoring & Assessment, May 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10661-016-5215-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kurt D. Carpenter, Kathryn M. Kuivila, Michelle L. Hladik, Tana Haluska, Michael B. Cole

Abstract

Insecticide use in urban areas results in the detection of these compounds in streams following stormwater runoff at concentrations likely to cause toxicity for stream invertebrates. In this 2013 study, stormwater runoff and streambed sediments were analyzed for 91 pesticides dissolved in water and 118 pesticides on sediment. Detections included 33 pesticides, including insecticides, fungicides, herbicides, degradates, and a synergist. Patterns in pesticide occurrence reveal transport of dissolved and sediment-bound pesticides, including pyrethroids, from upland areas through stormwater outfalls to receiving streams. Nearly all streams contained at least one insecticide at levels exceeding an aquatic-life benchmark, most often for bifenthrin and (or) fipronil. Multiple U.S. EPA benchmark or criterion exceedances occurred in 40 % of urban streams sampled. Bed sediment concentrations of bifenthrin were highly correlated (p < 0.001) with benthic invertebrate assemblages. Non-insects and tolerant invertebrates such as amphipods, flatworms, nematodes, and oligochaetes dominated streams with relatively high concentrations of bifenthrin in bed sediments, whereas insects, sensitive invertebrates, and mayflies were much more abundant at sites with no or low bifenthrin concentrations. The abundance of sensitive invertebrates, % EPT, and select mayfly taxa were strongly negatively correlated with organic-carbon normalized bifenthrin concentrations in streambed sediments. Our findings from western Clackamas County, Oregon (USA), expand upon previous research demonstrating the transport of pesticides from urban landscapes and linking impaired benthic invertebrate assemblages in urban streams with exposure to pyrethroid insecticides.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 4%
Mexico 1 4%
Poland 1 4%
Unknown 23 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 19%
Unspecified 3 12%
Student > Master 2 8%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Other 7 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 9 35%
Unspecified 8 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 19%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 4%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Other 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2017.
All research outputs
#1,199,863
of 12,322,982 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Monitoring & Assessment
#40
of 1,222 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,296
of 275,655 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Monitoring & Assessment
#2
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,322,982 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,222 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,655 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.