↓ Skip to main content

Improving access to medicines among clients of remote area Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Services

Overview of attention for article published in Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, September 2007
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
30 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Improving access to medicines among clients of remote area Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Services
Published in
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, September 2007
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-842x.2006.tb00113.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Margaret Kelaher, David Dunt, Debbie Taylor-Thomson, Nea Harrison, Lynette O'Donoghue, Tony Barnes, Ian Anderson

Abstract

Despite unequivocally worse health, expenditure on Indigenous people through the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) is considerably less than for other Australians. We report on the effectiveness of a program to supply PBS medicines to remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Services (ATSIHSs) under section 100 (s. 100) of the National Health Act 1953. Under the special PBS arrangements (SPBSAs), approved ATSIHSs are able to order PBS medicine in bulk through local pharmacies and supply them as needed to patients on-site. The usual co-payment associated with PBS medicine is not charged and the pharmacist remuneration structure is different. The project involved consultation with the evaluation reference group and other stakeholders at all stages. There were six main data collection components: public submissions; interviews with government and other key stakeholders; pharmacist survey; medicine utilisation and expenditure data; national ATSIHS minimum dataset; and case studies of ATSIHSs. These SPBSA potentially benefit 36% of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population. They have resulted in improved access to much-needed medicines, representing an increase of dollar 36.5 million in expenditure on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through the PBS between 2000/01 and 2002/03. They have further ensured that dollar 8.3 million of State and Territory expenditure formerly directed at medicine can be spent on prevention and primary care. Overall, the SPBSAs have been very successful and demonstrates an effective model for the development of Indigenous health policy.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 7%
United Kingdom 1 3%
Australia 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 25 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 33%
Student > Master 5 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Other 2 7%
Other 6 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 43%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 13%
Social Sciences 4 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 10%
Unspecified 2 7%
Other 4 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 July 2018.
All research outputs
#3,594,941
of 12,417,146 outputs
Outputs from Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
#584
of 1,454 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,141
of 269,406 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
#13
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,417,146 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,454 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.1. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,406 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.