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Trichosporon isolation from human ungueal infections: is there a pathogenic role?

Overview of attention for article published in Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia, April 2016
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Title
Trichosporon isolation from human ungueal infections: is there a pathogenic role?
Published in
Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia, April 2016
DOI 10.1590/abd1806-4841.20164632
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alba Regina de Magalhães, Marília Martins Nishikawa, Silvia Suzana Bona de Mondino, Heloisa Werneck de Macedo, Elisabeth Martins da Silva da Rocha, Andrea Regina de Souza Baptista

Abstract

Although dermatophytes are considered the major cause of onychomycosis, many reports have incriminated non-dermatophyte moulds and yeasts in the disease's etiology. Successive Trichosporon isolation from onychomycosis has led to the genus being suspected as a nail primary pathogen. To determine the prevalence of Trichosporon isolation in onychomycosis patients who attended a mycology diagnostic service in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, between January 2003 and December 2006. The study also includes a worldwide review on Trichosporon isolation prevalence in ungueal disease, emphasizing T. ovoides. This retrospective study was conducted with the support of staff from the Mycology Laboratory at the Dermatological Service of Rio de Janeiro's Santa Casa da Misericórdia (MLDS). Mycological analysis provided positive results equaling 47/5036 (0.93%) for Trichosporon spp.; obtained mainly as a single agent (72.35%), and from mixed cultures (27.65%; X2= 6.397; p= 0.018). The great majority belongs to the T. ovoides species (91.5%; n=43), obtained as a single isolate (74.41%; n= 32/43; X2 = 7.023; p= 0.014). Although T. ovoides is classically associated as an etiologic agent of white piedra, this study highlights its potential as a human nail disease pathogen. Our study opens doors for future epidemiologic and virulence factors aimed at determining whether T. ovoides is an important causative agent of onychomycosis in Brazil.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 14%
Student > Master 3 14%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Researcher 2 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Other 4 18%
Unknown 7 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 18%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Unknown 9 41%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 May 2016.
All research outputs
#11,169,692
of 12,554,428 outputs
Outputs from Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia
#394
of 394 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#220,335
of 264,553 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,554,428 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 394 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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