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Groundwater depletion and sustainability of irrigation in the US High Plains and Central Valley

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, May 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
policy
3 policy sources
twitter
22 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users
reddit
3 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
451 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
614 Mendeley
citeulike
4 CiteULike
Title
Groundwater depletion and sustainability of irrigation in the US High Plains and Central Valley
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, May 2012
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1200311109
Pubmed ID
Authors

B. R. Scanlon, C. C. Faunt, L. Longuevergne, R. C. Reedy, W. M. Alley, V. L. McGuire, P. B. McMahon

Abstract

Aquifer overexploitation could significantly impact crop production in the United States because 60% of irrigation relies on groundwater. Groundwater depletion in the irrigated High Plains and California Central Valley accounts for ~50% of groundwater depletion in the United States since 1900. A newly developed High Plains recharge map shows that high recharge in the northern High Plains results in sustainable pumpage, whereas lower recharge in the central and southern High Plains has resulted in focused depletion of 330 km(3) of fossil groundwater, mostly recharged during the past 13,000 y. Depletion is highly localized with about a third of depletion occurring in 4% of the High Plains land area. Extrapolation of the current depletion rate suggests that 35% of the southern High Plains will be unable to support irrigation within the next 30 y. Reducing irrigation withdrawals could extend the lifespan of the aquifer but would not result in sustainable management of this fossil groundwater. The Central Valley is a more dynamic, engineered system, with north/south diversions of surface water since the 1950s contributing to ~7× higher recharge. However, these diversions are regulated because of impacts on endangered species. A newly developed Central Valley Hydrologic Model shows that groundwater depletion since the 1960s, totaling 80 km(3), occurs mostly in the south (Tulare Basin) and primarily during droughts. Increasing water storage through artificial recharge of excess surface water in aquifers by up to 3 km(3) shows promise for coping with droughts and improving sustainability of groundwater resources in the Central Valley.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 22 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 614 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 10 2%
Canada 4 <1%
France 2 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Uganda 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 592 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 147 24%
Student > Master 125 20%
Researcher 98 16%
Student > Bachelor 46 7%
Professor 34 6%
Other 108 18%
Unknown 56 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 151 25%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 148 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 85 14%
Engineering 75 12%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 16 3%
Other 37 6%
Unknown 102 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 98. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 February 2019.
All research outputs
#186,961
of 14,498,785 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#4,185
of 82,711 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,089
of 123,513 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#44
of 901 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,498,785 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 82,711 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 123,513 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 901 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.