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Resistant to amyloid-β or just waiting for disease to happen?

Overview of attention for article published in Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, May 2012
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6 Mendeley
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Title
Resistant to amyloid-β or just waiting for disease to happen?
Published in
Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, May 2012
DOI 10.1186/alzrt122
Pubmed ID
Authors

Seth Love

Abstract

The post-mortem finding of abundant intracerebral accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) in the cerebral cortex of some people who develop minimal neurofibrillary pathology and remain cognitively intact until death (so-called pathological aging, or PA) challenges the orthodox view of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This issue of Alzheimer's Research and Therapy reports a study by Moore and colleagues, of the McKnight Brain Institute (Gainesville, FL, USA) and the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine (Jacksonville, FL, USA), who have performed the most detailed analysis to date of the levels and types of Aβ that accumulate in such cases. Although the levels of the different forms of Aβ in prefrontal cortex from patients with AD tended to be higher than those from patients with PA, the authors found extensive overlap between the two groups and suggest that PA is likely to represent a prodromal stage of AD. It is also possible that the quantity of Aβ is less important than the extent to which it accumulates intraneuronally or that some people are resistant to its effects - perhaps because of genetically determined differences in the inflammatory and astrocytic reactions to Aβ. The study emphasizes the continuing importance of careful human clinical and post-mortem studies in elucidating the pathogenesis of this disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 17%
Netherlands 1 17%
Unknown 4 67%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 50%
Professor 2 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 17%
Neuroscience 1 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 17%
Unknown 1 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 January 2013.
All research outputs
#8,072,286
of 14,013,582 outputs
Outputs from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#524
of 631 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61,103
of 122,727 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,013,582 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 631 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.5. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 122,727 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them