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Effect of pelvimetric diameters on success of surgery in patients submitted to robot-assisted perineal radical prostatectomy

Overview of attention for article published in International braz j urol, June 2020
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Title
Effect of pelvimetric diameters on success of surgery in patients submitted to robot-assisted perineal radical prostatectomy
Published in
International braz j urol, June 2020
DOI 10.1590/s1677-5538.ibju.2019.0413
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mustafa Gurkan Yenice, Ismail Yigitbasi, Rustu Turkay, Selcuk Sahin, Volkan Tugcu

Abstract

Minimally invasive techniques are used increasingly by virtue of advancements in technology. Surgery for prostate cancer, which has high morbidity, is performed with an increasing momentum based on the successful oncological and functional outcomes as well as cosmetic aspects. 62 patients underwent robot-assisted perineal radical prostatectomy (R-PRP) surgery at our clinic between November 2016 and August 2017. Six pelvimetric dimensions were defined and measured by performing multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) prior to operation in all patients. In light of these data, we aimed to investigate the effect of pelvimetric measurements on surgery duration and surgical margin positivity. By using this technique in pelvic area, we observed that measurements only representing surgical site and excluding other pelvic organs had a significant effect on surgery duration, and pelvic dimensions had no significant effect on surgical margin positivity. In R-PRP technique, peroperative findings and oncological outcomes can vary depending on several variable factors, but although usually not taken into account, pelvimetric measurements can also affect these outcomes. However, there is a need for randomised controlled trials to be conducted with more patients.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 42%
Researcher 2 17%
Student > Master 2 17%
Student > Postgraduate 1 8%
Unknown 2 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 17%
Chemical Engineering 1 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 8%
Other 2 17%
Unknown 3 25%