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Parasite manipulation of brain monoamines in California killifish ( Fundulus parvipinnis ) by the trematode Euhaplorchis californiensis

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, December 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
q&a
1 Q&A thread

Citations

dimensions_citation
64 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
158 Mendeley
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Title
Parasite manipulation of brain monoamines in California killifish ( Fundulus parvipinnis ) by the trematode Euhaplorchis californiensis
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, December 2008
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2008.1597
Pubmed ID
Authors

J.C Shaw, W.J Korzan, R.E Carpenter, A.M Kuris, K.D Lafferty, C.H Summers, Ø Øverli

Abstract

California killifish (Fundulus parvipinnis) infected with the brain-encysting trematode Euhaplorchis californiensis display conspicuous swimming behaviours rendering them more susceptible to predation by avian final hosts. Heavily infected killifish grow and reproduce normally, despite having thousands of cysts inside their braincases. This suggests that E. californiensis affects only specific locomotory behaviours. We hypothesised that changes in the serotonin and dopamine metabolism, essential for controlling locomotion and arousal may underlie this behaviour modification. We employed micropunch dissection and HPLC to analyse monoamine and monoamine metabolite concentrations in the brain regions of uninfected and experimentally infected fish. The parasites exerted density-dependent changes in monoaminergic activity distinct from those exhibited by fish subjected to stress. Specifically, E. californiensis inhibited a normally occurring, stress-induced elevation of serotonergic metabolism in the raphae nuclei. This effect was particularly evident in the experimentally infected fish, whose low-density infections were concentrated on the brainstem. Furthermore, high E. californiensis density was associated with increased dopaminergic activity in the hypothalamus and decreased serotonergic activity in the hippocampus. In conclusion, the altered monoaminergic metabolism may explain behavioural differences leading to increased predation of the infected killifish by their final host predators.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 158 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 4 3%
Portugal 3 2%
South Africa 3 2%
United States 3 2%
France 2 1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Greece 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 138 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 36 23%
Student > Master 33 21%
Student > Bachelor 28 18%
Researcher 25 16%
Professor 7 4%
Other 17 11%
Unknown 12 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 102 65%
Environmental Science 11 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 3%
Neuroscience 4 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 2%
Other 17 11%
Unknown 16 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 104. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 April 2021.
All research outputs
#312,409
of 21,730,136 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#843
of 9,620 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,413
of 144,284 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#7
of 131 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,730,136 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,620 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 144,284 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 131 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.