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Artemisinin resistance: current status and scenarios for containment

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Reviews Microbiology, March 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
408 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
585 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
connotea
2 Connotea
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Title
Artemisinin resistance: current status and scenarios for containment
Published in
Nature Reviews Microbiology, March 2010
DOI 10.1038/nrmicro2331
Pubmed ID
Authors

Arjen M. Dondorp, Shunmay Yeung, Lisa White, Chea Nguon, Nicholas P.J. Day, Duong Socheat, Lorenz von Seidlein

Abstract

Artemisinin combination therapies are the first-line treatments for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in most malaria-endemic countries. Recently, partial artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum malaria has emerged on the Cambodia-Thailand border. Exposure of the parasite population to artemisinin monotherapies in subtherapeutic doses for over 30 years, and the availability of substandard artemisinins, have probably been the main driving force in the selection of the resistant phenotype in the region. A multifaceted containment programme has recently been launched, including early diagnosis and appropriate treatment, decreasing drug pressure, optimising vector control, targeting the mobile population, strengthening management and surveillance systems, and operational research. Mathematical modelling can be a useful tool to evaluate possible strategies for containment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 585 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 11 2%
United States 3 <1%
Tanzania, United Republic of 2 <1%
Switzerland 2 <1%
Belgium 2 <1%
Mexico 2 <1%
Ireland 2 <1%
Thailand 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Other 10 2%
Unknown 547 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 123 21%
Student > Master 111 19%
Researcher 97 17%
Student > Bachelor 69 12%
Student > Postgraduate 40 7%
Other 92 16%
Unknown 53 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 177 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 97 17%
Chemistry 78 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 65 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 27 5%
Other 67 11%
Unknown 74 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2020.
All research outputs
#3,351,009
of 17,361,274 outputs
Outputs from Nature Reviews Microbiology
#1,303
of 2,398 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,328
of 133,255 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Reviews Microbiology
#15
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,361,274 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,398 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.9. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 133,255 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.