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The prevention access and risk taking in young people (PARTY) project protocol: A cluster randomised controlled trial of health risk screening and motivational interviewing for young people…

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, June 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
145 Mendeley
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Title
The prevention access and risk taking in young people (PARTY) project protocol: A cluster randomised controlled trial of health risk screening and motivational interviewing for young people presenting to general practice
Published in
BMC Public Health, June 2012
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-12-400
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lena Sanci, Brenda Grabsch, Patty Chondros, Alan Shiell, Jane Pirkis, Susan Sawyer, Kelsey Hegarty, Elizabeth Patterson, Helen Cahill, Elizabeth Ozer, Janelle Seymour, George Patton

Abstract

There are growing worldwide concerns about the ability of primary health care systems to manage the major burden of illness in young people. Over two thirds of premature adult deaths result from risks that manifest in adolescence, including injury, neuropsychiatric problems and consequences of risky behaviours. One policy response is to better reorientate primary health services towards prevention and early intervention. Currently, however, there is insufficient evidence to support this recommendation for young people. This paper describes the design and implementation of a trial testing an intervention to promote psychosocial risk screening of all young people attending general practice and to respond to identified risks using motivational interviewing. Main outcomes: clinicians' detection of risk-taking and emotional distress, young people's intention to change and reduction of risk taking. Secondary outcomes: pathways to care, trust in the clinician and likelihood of returning for future visits. The design of the economic and process evaluation are not detailed in this protocol.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 145 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 144 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 34 23%
Student > Master 25 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 11%
Student > Bachelor 14 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 7%
Other 30 21%
Unknown 16 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 34 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 25 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 12%
Social Sciences 17 12%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 6 4%
Other 27 19%
Unknown 18 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2015.
All research outputs
#2,149,729
of 12,372,633 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,554
of 8,418 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,588
of 120,908 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#11
of 88 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,372,633 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,418 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 120,908 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 88 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.