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Promoting protective factors for young adolescents: ABCD Parenting Young Adolescents Program randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Adolescence, October 2012
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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94 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Promoting protective factors for young adolescents: ABCD Parenting Young Adolescents Program randomized controlled trial
Published in
Journal of Adolescence, October 2012
DOI 10.1016/j.adolescence.2012.05.002
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kylie Burke, Leah Brennan, Warren Cann

Abstract

This study examined the efficacy of a program for parents of young adolescents combining behavioral family intervention with acceptance-based strategies. 180 parents were randomly allocated to a 6-session group ABCD Parenting Young Adolescent Program or wait-list condition. Completer analysis indicated parents in the intervention reported significantly higher adolescent prosocial behaviors (p = 0.020), lower conduct problems (p = 0.048) and total difficulties (p = 0.041). These parents also reported lower stress associated with adolescent moodiness (p = 0.032), parent life-restriction (p < 0.001), adult-relations (p < 0.001), social isolation (p = 0.012), incompetence/guilt (p < 0.001), lower stress in the parenting domain (p < 0.001) and lower overall stress (p = 0.003) relative to the control condition following the intervention period. No other statistically significant differences were evident (p < 0.05). Results of intention-to-treat analyses were similar. Greater reliable clinically significant change was also achieved for the intervention condition. Participants reported high satisfaction with all elements of the ABCD program. Results suggest the program may assist parents of young adolescents to promote or maintain protective factors in their families. Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ANZCTRN12609000194268.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Sweden 1 1%
Unknown 91 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 17%
Researcher 14 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 14%
Student > Master 13 14%
Unspecified 8 9%
Other 30 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 45 48%
Social Sciences 14 15%
Unspecified 13 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 4%
Other 5 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 January 2013.
All research outputs
#6,592,624
of 12,211,167 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Adolescence
#553
of 889 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,132
of 116,383 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Adolescence
#7
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,211,167 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 889 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.9. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 116,383 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.