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Tracking climate impacts on the migratory monarch butterfly

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, January 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
75 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
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Title
Tracking climate impacts on the migratory monarch butterfly
Published in
Global Change Biology, January 2012
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2486.2012.02751.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zipkin, Elise F., Ries, Leslie, Reeves, Rick, Regetz, James, Oberhauser, Karen S., Elise F. Zipkin, Leslie Ries, Rick Reeves, James Regetz, Karen S. Oberhauser

Abstract

Understanding the impacts of climate on migratory species is complicated by the fact that these species travel through several climates that may be changing in diverse ways throughout their complete migratory cycle. Most studies are not designed to tease out the direct and indirect effects of climate at various stages along the migration route. We assess the impacts of spring and summer climate conditions on breeding monarch butterflies, a species that completes its annual migration cycle over several generations. No single, broad-scale climate metric can explain summer breeding phenology or the substantial year-to-year fluctuations observed in population abundances. As such, we built a Poisson regression model to help explain annual arrival times and abundances in the Midwestern United States. We incorporated the climate conditions experienced both during a spring migration/breeding phase in Texas as well as during subsequent arrival and breeding during the main recruitment period in Ohio. Using data from a state-wide butterfly monitoring network in Ohio, our results suggest that climate acts in conflicting ways during the spring and summer seasons. High spring precipitation in Texas is associated with the largest annual population growth in Ohio and the earliest arrival to the summer breeding ground, as are intermediate spring temperatures in Texas. On the other hand, the timing of monarch arrivals to the summer breeding grounds is not affected by climate conditions within Ohio. Once in Ohio for summer breeding, precipitation has minimal impacts on overall abundances, whereas warmer summer temperatures are generally associated with the highest expected abundances, yet this effect is mitigated by the average seasonal temperature of each location in that the warmest sites receive no benefit of above average summer temperatures. Our results highlight the complex relationship between climate and performance for a migrating species and suggest that attempts to understand how monarchs will be affected by future climate conditions will be challenging.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 8%
Spain 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Denmark 1 1%
Unknown 66 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 25%
Student > Bachelor 16 21%
Researcher 13 17%
Other 5 7%
Student > Master 5 7%
Other 17 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 48 64%
Environmental Science 17 23%
Unspecified 3 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 1%
Other 3 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 February 2014.
All research outputs
#370,797
of 4,505,915 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#480
of 1,620 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,622
of 76,307 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#4
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,505,915 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,620 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 76,307 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.