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The ecology of climate change and infectious diseases

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology, April 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

dimensions_citation
744 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1167 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
connotea
2 Connotea
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Title
The ecology of climate change and infectious diseases
Published in
Ecology, April 2009
DOI 10.1890/08-0079.1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kevin D. Lafferty

Abstract

The projected global increase in the distribution and prevalence of infectious diseases with climate change suggests a pending societal crisis. The subject is increasingly attracting the attention of health professionals and climate-change scientists, particularly with respect to malaria and other vector-transmitted human diseases. The result has been the emergence of a crisis discipline, reminiscent of the early phases of conservation biology. Latitudinal, altitudinal, seasonal, and interannual associations between climate and disease along with historical and experimental evidence suggest that climate, along with many other factors, can affect infectious diseases in a nonlinear fashion. However, although the globe is significantly warmer than it was a century ago, there is little evidence that climate change has already favored infectious diseases. While initial projections suggested dramatic future increases in the geographic range of infectious diseases, recent models predict range shifts in disease distributions, with little net increase in area. Many factors can affect infectious disease, and some may overshadow the effects of climate.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,167 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 35 3%
United Kingdom 10 <1%
South Africa 7 <1%
Germany 6 <1%
Canada 5 <1%
Argentina 5 <1%
Spain 4 <1%
France 3 <1%
Ecuador 3 <1%
Other 24 2%
Unknown 1065 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 258 22%
Researcher 195 17%
Student > Bachelor 181 16%
Student > Master 165 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 64 5%
Other 169 14%
Unknown 135 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 499 43%
Environmental Science 187 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 61 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 49 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 37 3%
Other 162 14%
Unknown 172 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 92. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 June 2022.
All research outputs
#356,617
of 21,732,065 outputs
Outputs from Ecology
#117
of 6,365 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,645
of 143,112 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology
#1
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,732,065 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,365 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 143,112 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.