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Partitioning the Proteome: Phase Separation for Targeted Analysis of Membrane Proteins in Human Post-Mortem Brain

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, June 2012
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Title
Partitioning the Proteome: Phase Separation for Targeted Analysis of Membrane Proteins in Human Post-Mortem Brain
Published in
PLOS ONE, June 2012
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0039509
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jane A. English, Bruno Manadas, Caitriona Scaife, David R. Cotter, Michael J. Dunn

Abstract

Neuroproteomics is a powerful platform for targeted and hypothesis driven research, providing comprehensive insights into cellular and sub-cellular disease states, Gene × Environmental effects, and cellular response to medication effects in human, animal, and cell culture models. Analysis of sub-proteomes is becoming increasingly important in clinical proteomics, enriching for otherwise undetectable proteins that are possible markers for disease. Membrane proteins are one such sub-proteome class that merit in-depth targeted analysis, particularly in psychiatric disorders. As membrane proteins are notoriously difficult to analyse using traditional proteomics methods, we evaluate a paradigm to enrich for and study membrane proteins from human post-mortem brain tissue. This is the first study to extensively characterise the integral trans-membrane spanning proteins present in human brain. Using Triton X-114 phase separation and LC-MS/MS analysis, we enriched for and identified 494 membrane proteins, with 194 trans-membrane helices present, ranging from 1 to 21 helices per protein. Isolated proteins included glutamate receptors, G proteins, voltage gated and calcium channels, synaptic proteins, and myelin proteins, all of which warrant quantitative proteomic investigation in psychiatric and neurological disorders. Overall, our sub-proteome analysis reduced sample complexity and enriched for integral membrane proteins by 2.3 fold, thus allowing for more manageable, reproducible, and targeted proteomics in case vs. control biomarker studies. This study provides a valuable reference for future neuroproteomic investigations of membrane proteins, and validates the use Triton X-114 detergent phase extraction on human post mortem brain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 4%
Unknown 23 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 25%
Student > Master 5 21%
Researcher 3 13%
Professor 2 8%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Other 5 21%
Unknown 1 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 8%
Engineering 2 8%
Neuroscience 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 June 2012.
All research outputs
#11,890,891
of 18,245,787 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#105,806
of 168,804 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#82,118
of 135,441 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#2,130
of 3,278 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,245,787 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 168,804 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.7. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 135,441 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,278 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.