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To protect and to support: How citizenship and self-determination are legally constructed and managed in practice for people living with dementia in Sweden

Overview of attention for article published in Dementia (14713012), May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Readers on

mendeley
11 Mendeley
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Title
To protect and to support: How citizenship and self-determination are legally constructed and managed in practice for people living with dementia in Sweden
Published in
Dementia (14713012), May 2016
DOI 10.1177/1471301216638966
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nedlund, Ann-Charlotte, Taghizadeh Larsson, Annika

Abstract

Since living with dementia implies increasing difficulties in taking charge of rights due to cognitive as well as communicative impairments, many people with dementia are vulnerable and in need of support in order to realize full citizenship. In Sweden, all adults right to self-determination is strongly emphasized in law, regulations, and policies. Further, and in contrast to the situation in many other countries, people living with dementia cannot be declared as incompetent of making decisions concerning social care and their right to self-determination cannot legally be taken away. The article shows that in the Swedish welfare system, the focus is more on protecting the self-determination of citizens than on supporting people in making decisions and exercising citizenship. Subsequently, this causes legally constructed zones of inclusion and exclusion. This article examines and problematizes how different institutional contexts, legal constructions, norms, and practices in Sweden affect the management of issues concerning guardianship, supported decision-making and self-determination, and outline the implications for people living with dementia.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 27%
Student > Master 2 18%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 9%
Student > Bachelor 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Other 3 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 5 45%
Psychology 2 18%
Unspecified 1 9%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 9%
Neuroscience 1 9%
Other 1 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 May 2016.
All research outputs
#1,067,403
of 7,724,913 outputs
Outputs from Dementia (14713012)
#169
of 520 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,745
of 268,777 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Dementia (14713012)
#14
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,724,913 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 520 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,777 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.